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Green open spaces
20 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Shakespeare Garden at Lightwoods House & Park

I've only managed to go into the Shakespeare Garden once at Lightwoods House & Park. That was during November 2017, after the house and other structures in the park were fully restored. It was usually open daily from 10am until 4pm. But on my last visit to the park in June 2020 it was closed (probably due to the pandemic and lockdown). Would be nice to go into it again soon

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The Shakespeare Garden at Lightwoods House & Park





I've only managed to go into the Shakespeare Garden once at Lightwoods House & Park. That was during November 2017, after the house and other structures in the park were fully restored. It was usually open daily from 10am until 4pm. But on my last visit to the park in June 2020 it was closed (probably due to the pandemic and lockdown). Would be nice to go into it again soon


The Shakespeare Garden at Lightwoods Park & House

Some history about The Shakespeare Garden from the official Lightwoods Park & House website.

The garden was established in 1915 within the house's former walled gardens. The restored gardens was named after the bard William Shakespeare, and the shrubs were named after the playwrights works. The garden was designed on an Elizabethan theme. The garden is open to the public and is a fantastic venue for a variety of events. The idea for a Shakespeare Garden was conceived by Councillor G. Johnson, who was then Chairman of the Parks Committee, and was opened by the Lord Mayor, Alderman W. Bowater on the 22nd July 1915. The Elizabethan themed garden has a "knot garden", herb and fruit garden, containing many of the plants mentioned in Shakespeare's plays.

The garden was formerly the kitchen garden to Lightwoods Hall which at one point was the residence of Sir Francis Galton.

 

2011

My first glimpse of the Shakespeare Garden was from outside the gate during March 2011. It was not open on the day of my visit, and was before it was restored. So could only have a look through the locked gate at the time.

Shakespeare Garden sign on the wall from the outside.

The ornate gate to the garden was padlocked, so couldn't go in (might have been the weekend so would have been closed any way).

Flower bed outside the Shakespeare Garden to the left of the gate. Lots of yellows and some pinks and reds here.

A look through the gate. Was some daffodils growing on the left near the big tree.

Trying to get the view of the garden to the left of the big tree.

2017

A visit to Lightwoods Park in November 2017. The house was restored, and the Shakespeare Garden was open, so I went in and had a look (was probably a weekday).

Being that it was late autumn, and almost winter at the time, the trees were mostly bare of leaves.

A main path down the middle of the garden towards those trellises.

In the middle was the Knot Garden with the box hedges. You can see Lightwoods House from here which is to the left.

In 2012 during the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II this green plaque was unveiled about John Tradescant (1608 - 1662) who was a Royal Gardener. There was also a stone sculpture of him to the left of the plaque. From the Smethwick Local History Society.

A lot of bright sunshine under the trellises towards the fountain in the centre.

A close up look at the fountain. Was some benches around it to sit on.

The far end of the garden down the main path. Lightwoods House to the right.

Another part of the box hedges in the Knot Garden.

2020

Early June 2020, and my first time back in Lightwoods Park for almost 3 years. While there, went past Lightwoods House and the Shakespeare Garden. But the gate was locked. Probably due to the pandemic / lockdown (I would assume that it has since reopened since my last visit).

Looks like they had installed a new gate here. I must have walked through it in 2017, so what happened to the old gate?

With the new gate being locked, I again had to look at the garden through it. The grass was looking a bit long.

Long grass on the border to the right. Flowers of pink and red colours.

I couldn't see many more flowers to the left, just all looking green towards the box hedges to the far left.

Outside was this sign with the opening hours of 10am to 4pm daily. No dogs are allowed in the garden, nor is bikes, scooters or skateboards. Children must be supervised.

Hopefully the garden was allowed to reopen as of July 2020. I look forward to going into it again in the future.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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70 passion points
Environment & green action
16 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

An Autumn and Summer comparison at Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens

Had two visits to Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens. First time back in October 2018 during the autumn, when there was pumpkins around for Halloween. Second time more recently during July 2020 in the summer as they reopened. For that one you had to book your tickets online before you went. A walled garden split into the Upper and Lower Wilderness. Was also a maze here and a vegetable garden.

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An Autumn and Summer comparison at Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens





Had two visits to Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens. First time back in October 2018 during the autumn, when there was pumpkins around for Halloween. Second time more recently during July 2020 in the summer as they reopened. For that one you had to book your tickets online before you went. A walled garden split into the Upper and Lower Wilderness. Was also a maze here and a vegetable garden.


CASTLE BROMWICH HALL GARDENS

Welcome to Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens. Located in Castle Bromwich in the Metropolitan Borough of Solihull. If approaching from Birmingham in a car or on the bus, you might pass through Hodge Hill. The gardens were originally developed here in the late 17th century. They were done in the Dutch style that was popular during the reign of William III. The Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens Trust was formed in 1985. At the time the walled gardens were derelict, but in the years that followed the gardeners restored the garden to how it could of once been in the past. The gardens is only 5 miles from Birmingham City Centre.

Castle Bromwich Hall was built in the 16th century for Sir Edward Devereux, who was the first MP for Tamworth. In the late 1650s the hall and gardens was sold to Sir Orlando Bridgeman who bought it for his son Sir John Bridgeman I. The gardens were developed by 1700. John Bridgeman II took over from his father after his death in 1710. The last member of the family, Lady Ida Bridgeman lived in the hall until her death in 1936. The gardens were looked after by her while she was still alive.

The hall and gardens are in separate ownership. The hall is now a hotel, but can be viewed from the gardens, and it is possible to have guided tours of the hall. The Trust owns the gardens, while the Parkland by Birmingham City Council (it is protected from development).

The gardens feature an Orangery and directly opposite that down the Holly Walk is the Summer House. There is a pair of sphinxs on two corners of the wall. It is usually possible to do walks on the outside of the wall, where you can go past the Mirror Pond, orchard, Wildflower meadow and the Children's mud kitchen.

Within the Walled Garden is the Upper Wilderness (which is close to the Hall) and the Lower Wilderness (which has a Maze in the middle of it). And further north of that is a Vegetable Garden.

The gardens is near the M6 motorway and you can hear the passing traffic. Entrance to the gardens is off Chester Road. 

2018

A visit during October 2018 in the weeks leading up to Halloween. First up a look at the Upper Wilderness. This was the Formal Box Hedges.

Looking up Holly Walk towards the Summer House. At this end (behind me) was the Orangery.

A zoom in of the Summer House. That day the doors were closed so couldn't go into it.

The flower borders not far from the Lower Wilderness, although the North Orchard was to the left of here. In the distance was one of the pair of stone sphinxes.

A close up look at the wonderful flowers they had here. Yellows and reds. Even in the middle of the autumn!

Now gone outside of the Walled Garden. Saw a pond with algae in it.

Another view of the algae covered pond.

This bit around the tree was called Jutta's Wild Weaving.

A look at the autumnal trees with yellow leaves.

Over the footbridge to another pond with algae. This is the Children's Mud Kitchen area I think.

Back into the Walled Garden. A look down Holly Walk towards the Orangery. At the time there was lots of pumpkins inside of it. As well as potted plants.

Into the Maze with this Globe sculpture on a stone plinth.

In aother of the mazes "rooms" was these flowers and bushes. As well as the trellis holding up a plant.

The view of the outside of the Maze from the Lower Wilderness.

Over to the Upper Wilderness, the side of garden closest to Castle Bromwich Hall.

At the time it was possible to go into the part of the garden closest to the hall. There was greenhouses down here.

There was also this Hedged Garden that you could go into.

Back into the Walled Garden was the Melon Ground. At the time there was a lot of pumpkins around here. Behind on the left outside of the wall was a rather old tree.

Some pumpkins and yellow and orang flowers around some spooky plants.

Outside of the Visitor Centre and shop was this collection of pumpkins. Probably for sale at the time.

2020

A July 2020 visit. Checking their website I noticed that you could book tickets, now that the gardens are open again. Booked the tickets for the same day. There is now a shop in the Orangery where you can buy a drink and a snack and sit at the tables and chairs on Holly Walk. View from the main gates entrance into the Walled Garden of the Upper Wilderness. There is a one way system in and out.

More green and colourful flowers in the Summer down the Boxed Hedges in the Upper Wilderness.

I thought this tent on the Archery Green was new. But I'd previous seen it there on the last visit. Families can have picnics here, or do some fun activities, while staying dry. The Summer House was seen to the right.

A look up the hedges in the Lower Wilderness. Benches here haven't been taped over, so you can still sit down on them.

This time around, you couldn't go through the doors to the area behind the Walled Garden, as a large tree had dropped a branch overnight and it was not safe to enter. Instead saw the Mirror Pond for the second time through the bars in the Walled Garden.

The long green that goes up from the Mirror Pond towards Castle Bromwich Hall. If you turn around you can see 103 Colmore Row in the distance (better views from the top of the hill). Almost like a co-incidence that they line up like that.

Various flower beds in the Vegetable Garden. There is a small greenhouse in the distance, and the other stone sphinx is up there as well.

Saw this A frame of wooden sticks over this part of the Vegetable Gaden. Around those orange flowers.

The lawn in the Upper Wilderness towards the main entrance of the gardens.

Some more boxed hedges in the north west corner of the Upper Wilderness, towards the Summer House.

View zoomed in from the Upper Wilderness to the main entrance gate. Behind is the portacabins that is the offices of the gardens. Also nearby was plant sales.

Another part of the Upper Wilderness, around this curved lawn path.

Found this view of Castle Bromwich Hall from the Upper Wilderness. The closest you can get to the hall is the fence and wall in the garden to have a look at it.

The back of the boxed hedges in the Upper Wilderness close to the main entrance and the Melon Ground. There was a pair of pyramid structures at the middle of both of the flower beds.

A wonderful summery view from the garden towards the Orangery. Now used as a shop / cafe. But only one person / family can go into it at a time during the pandemic, with social distancing regulations. They have hand sanitiser outside.

One more walk around the garden before we got a drink from the Orangery. The hedges in the Lower Wilderness, towards that bench.

The central area of the Lower Wilderness is in a circle around those stones. On a closer look at the stones I could see a face on one of them.

Towards the Maze from the Lower Wilderness. This time didn't go into the maze (forgot about it). That and we went on the routes around it from the outside,

After exiting via the Melon Ground (and spraying some hand sanitiser onto my hands), saw some lavender and more tables and chairs that you could sit on to have your coffee or tea (bought from the Orangery). Behind was an old style table and chairs where you could have your picture taken, and share with Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens on social media.

Turned around to the door from the Melon Ground. Lavender either side of the path. Plus that table and chairs for the picture was on the left of here. This is one way to exit the gardens.

If you would want to make your own visit to the gardens, the link is at the top of the post (click on The Castle Bromwich Hall Gardens Trust). They are now open Wednesday to Sunday every week. Tickets were around £5 each.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
15 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Waseley Hills Country Park and the Source of the River Rea

Went for a morning walk at the end of June 2020 around the Waseley Hills Country Park. It was quite windy that day. The country park is near Rubery in the Bromsgrove District of Worcestershire. And over the border from New Frankley in Birmingham. You would find the source of the River Rea here. Also it is possible to see views of Birmingham and Worcestershire from here.

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The Waseley Hills Country Park and the Source of the River Rea





Went for a morning walk at the end of June 2020 around the Waseley Hills Country Park. It was quite windy that day. The country park is near Rubery in the Bromsgrove District of Worcestershire. And over the border from New Frankley in Birmingham. You would find the source of the River Rea here. Also it is possible to see views of Birmingham and Worcestershire from here.


Waseley Hills Country Park

The Waseley Hills Country Park is located close to Rubery in the Bromsgrove District of Worcestershire. The M5 motorway is not too far away from the country park to the west. The main entrance to the North Car Park is from Gannow Green Lane. Which can be reached in a car if you drive up from New Frankley in Birmingham. The park has a Visitor Centre, and public toilets (which is near to the North Car Park).  Also offices and a meeting room. A playground was also nearby.

There is two main hills, Windmill Hill and Waseley Hill. The views here are stunning. You would also be able to find the Source of the River Rea (it is signposted).

We visited on the 29th June 2020, and I noticed that the Visitor Centre was open. Or rather they were selling takeaway coffee and ice cream over a table. This was probably the Windmill Cafe. For the car park, you can pay £2 for up to 2 hours, or £2.50 for all day. An annual pass will cost you £35. Blue badge holders are free.

The name Waseley comes from the Anglo Saxon word 'waer' meaning sheep and 'ley' meaning field. Hence waer-ley or sheep field. This shows that the site has been grazed for hundreds of years. On my visit, one of the fields had cattle grazing and you had to close the gate behind you when entering it.

Waseley Hills Country Park Visitor Centre

As seen from the North Car Park was the Visitor Centre. It was only open for takeaway coffee and ice cream, which could be had at the picnic benches to the right. I would think that the Windmill Cafe was in here. The website describes it as an ancient barn.

Side view of the Visitor Centre coming back from our walk around the hills.  Was some more picnic tables to the right.

To the left of the Visitor Centre was these Offices and Meeting Rooms. Plus another picnic table outside.

The public toilets for the gents (right) and ladies (left) seemed to be open.

It had street art by famous Birmingham graffiti artist Newso. There was also a point here for dog owners to fill up a bowl of water for their dog to drink out of.

Source of the River Rea

If you are wondering where the River Rea starts on it's journey into Birmingham, it starts here at the Waseley Hills!

This sign explains it all. The River Rea starts from the source and flows for some 15 miles north east until it joins the River Tame near Spaghetti Junction.

Only a trickle of water at this point, but over 20 miles from here there used to mills all along the Rea Valley. Many used to grind corn and the earliest dated to the 13th century.

In the English Civil War, the mills along the Rea were used to make sword blades for the Parliamentary army.

The same mills in the 19th century provided water power for the expansion of Birmingham's metal working industry during the Industrial Revolution. Sadly none of these mills survive today. Many were demolished in the late 19th or early 20th century.

Windmill Hill and Waseley Hill

These hills can be easily confused so I will combine them both in this section.

First up a look up Windmill Hill towards the electricity pylon.

After ending the gate on Windmill Hill, a look up to where the cows were grazing at the top of the hill.

After seeing the Source of the River Rea went to the top of Windmill Hill for the views of the Birmingham skyline. It was very windy up here.

This was the view from the Waseley Hills towards Birmingham. Old Joe was visible (at the University of Birmingham). But the rest of the skyline would be more visible on zooming in. The City Centre was to the far left of this view.

There was also views towards Rubery. Including the tower blocks. They were Dowry House, Hillside House and Quarry House. A view from Beacon Hill I saw years ago that I thought was the Waseley Hills was in face the Rubery Hill Public Open Space on Cock Hill Lane.

After getting the views of Birmingham, was time to head back down the hill. This was on the Skylark Trail.

Back out to the part of Windmill Hill close to the car park and Visitor Centre. Next up to go to the other part of Windmill Hill.

On the next part of Windmill Hill, you could go around a path in a circle, and go under a line of electricity pylons.

I saw this TV antenna or mobile phone mast from Windmill Hill in the distance.

A short time later checking out Waseley Hill and the stunning views of Worcestershire. Getting quite windy up here.

There was an even better view of the electricity pylons going into Worcestershire in the distance. Some many trees here!

The main path if you wanted to walk further onto Waseley Hill. You might see rabbit holes around here or gorse. Although I didn't spot any rabbits or gorse growing at the time of my visit.

There was more of the Waseley Hills Country Park to walk from here, for instance as far as the South Car Park.

But we turned back from here and walked back to the North Car Park. It was just too windy. But saw enough.

Heading back past Windmill Hill and saw this line of electricity pylons heading into the distance in Worcestershire. It was quite cloudy and misty that day.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Rivers, lakes & canals
15 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Ariel Aqueduct on the Worcester & Birmingham Canal in Selly Oak

The Ariel Aqueduct was built alongside a railway viaduct on the Cross City Line in Selly Oak when the Selly Oak Bypass was built, which opened in 2011. It carries the Worcester & Birmingham Canal. The towpath is suitable for walking, cycling and taking your dog for a walk, as well as going for a run. You can also see trains going past. Below is the Aston Webb Boulevard.

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The Ariel Aqueduct on the Worcester & Birmingham Canal in Selly Oak





The Ariel Aqueduct was built alongside a railway viaduct on the Cross City Line in Selly Oak when the Selly Oak Bypass was built, which opened in 2011. It carries the Worcester & Birmingham Canal. The towpath is suitable for walking, cycling and taking your dog for a walk, as well as going for a run. You can also see trains going past. Below is the Aston Webb Boulevard.


Ariel Aqueduct

When the Selly Oak Bypass (later to be named as the Aston Webb Boulevard) was built in Selly Oak during 2010 to 2011, it meant that an aqueduct had to built on the Worcester & Birmingham Canal, as well as a railway viaduct on the Cross City Line. The nearby wasteland used to be where the Battery Works used to be. With the completion of the first phase of the bypass, it meant that the University of Birmingham could build new student accommodation nearby to the aqueduct. Further up the bypass, the land had to be decontaminated, as there used to be a landfill there. Eventually the Selly Oak Shopping Park and a student accommodation block was opened in late 2018. And the rest of the land (still to be built on) will be for the Life Sciences Park of the University of Birmingham. Meanwhile since Sainsbury's moved to the new shopping park, it meant that work could start on extending the bypass to Selly Oak Triangle (started in 2019 but is not yet complete).

I used to be able to get onto the Worcester & Birmingham Canal down a road off the Bristol Road near a car showroom. But there is now new steps closed to the Unite student accommodation (as well as a shortcut to Sainsbury's and the new shopping park). Then walk as far as the University of Birmingham before getting off the canal.

 

View below of the Ariel Aqueduct from the Aston Webb Boulevard (Selly Oak Bypass) during September 2012. Leading towards Queen Elizabeth Island and New Fosse Way. The new Birmingham Super Hospital opened in 2010, so these new roads helped give access to it (the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham).

The views of the Ariel Aqueduct taken during February 2013. This was during a walk along the canal from Selly Oak to the University of Birmingham.

The towpath turns slightly to the right as you head onto the aqueduct.

Saw a man in green running past me. Best to stop and let them pass you.

From here you can see the railway viaduct on the right. If you are lucky you could see some trains passing by!

Some nice reflections from the railings. You can only get to the other side in a narrowboat.

In January 2014, could see the completed Victoria Hall from the Ariel Aqueduct next to Old Joe.

Within a few years of the completion of the bypass several student accommodation blocks got built down there.

Jarratt Hall is seen to the right of the aqueduct.

The view of the bypass. The University of Birmingham is on the left. The Bournbrook area of Selly Oak is on the right.

The view below taken during August 2017. It always feels weird walking over the aqueduct. It's so high up above the bypass.

In this February 2019 view, I caught a view of the Ariel Aqueduct from a train passing over the railway viaduct.

In August 2019 on another walk over the Ariel Aqueduct, saw a cyclist going past me. The grass and trees more grown by this point.

Went over it again during January 2020. This time a cyclist in orange was coming towards me.

From the other side, caught a Class 323 West Midlands Railway train passing over that railway bridge. Touch Base Pears seen behind.

For another post on aqueducts in the West Midlands region go to this post on the Wootton Wawen & Edstone Aqueducts on the Stratford-on-Avon Canal in Warwickshire.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Rivers, lakes & canals
14 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

The Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and Windmill Pool at Earlswood Lakes

A visit to Earlswood Lakes near Solihull in June 2020. Built as canal feeder reservoirs for the Stratford-on-Avon Canal, they are within the Stratford-on-Avon District of Warwickshire. Three pools including the Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and Windmill Pool. Built in the 1820s. Also here is the Earlswood Engine House built in 1821 to pump water to the canal. Good for walks.

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The Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and Windmill Pool at Earlswood Lakes





A visit to Earlswood Lakes near Solihull in June 2020. Built as canal feeder reservoirs for the Stratford-on-Avon Canal, they are within the Stratford-on-Avon District of Warwickshire. Three pools including the Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and Windmill Pool. Built in the 1820s. Also here is the Earlswood Engine House built in 1821 to pump water to the canal. Good for walks.


Earlswood Lakes

A visit to Earlswood Lakes for a morning walk on the 8th June 2020. I'd never been here before as The Lakes Station on the Shakespeare Line is a request stop, so hadn't got around to going here (I had previous got a train to Earlswood Station and gone to Earlswood Garden & Landscape Centre but no further). Ended up going in the car. The car park on Wood Lane were open again and is a good starting point for a walk around the lakes.

The Earlswood Lakes are three man made reservoirs built in the 1820s in Earlswood, Warwickshire to supply water to the nearby Stratford-on-Avon Canal. Which goes from Kings Norton Junction (from the Worcester & Birmingham Canal in Kings Norton) to Bancroft Basin in Stratford-upon-Avon. Construction took 5 years and some of the labour force included prisoners of war from the Napoleonic Wars. Being that it was so close to Birmingham, the lakes was popular from visitors from the city from the early 1900s. The Lakes Station nearby would get visitors on the Shakespeare Line from Birmingham to Stratford-upon-Avon (although today it is a request stop). Is about a 15 minute walk away. The car park at Earlswood Lakes is free.

There is three pools here, the Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and the Windmill Pool. There is also the Grade II listed Engine House next to the Engine Pool. The lakes are good for walking, fishing and sailing. You would find a variety of wildlife here, plus there is also a nearby Craft Centre.

 

The walk we did was started around the Engine Pool. Then went around Terry's Pool. Completed the second part of the Engine Pool. Then passed the Windmill Pool (but didn't go around it). Cycling around Earlswood Lakes is not currently allowed. So cyclists must stick to the main roads only.

 

Earlswood Engine House

The Engine House was built in 1821 and is a Grade II listed building. It is near the car park on Wood Lane and can also be seen from Valley Road and from the Engine Pool. It had a steam engine which pumped water from Earlswood Lakes to the nearby Stratford-on-Avon Canal. This view was over the fence from the car park.

There was also views of the Engine House from the other side of the Engine Pool. Built of red brick, it also has a low pitched Welsh slate roof.

This close up view of the Engine House from the Engine Pool, not far from Valley Road. I think it is no longer in use. But there is also a white plaque to the left hand side of the building.

Engine Pool

First up a walk around the Engine Pool at Earlswood Lakes. We headed to the right, starting from the car park.

There is a metal footbridge with a dam between the Engine Pool and Terry's Pool.

The water in the lake had receeded quite a bit. This was only a week or so after the May heatwave had ended.

Some parts of the Engine Pool had these old wooden decking. Some could do with repairing.

Crossing the metal footbridge between the Engine Pool (left) and Terry's Pool (right).

These wooden steps to the Engine Pool look broken. In need of repair.

With the water so low at the time, people could walk on the banks of the reservoir. After the walk around Terry's Pool, we resumed the walk around the Engine Pool towards Malthouse Lane.

Later on was crossing Malthouse Lane between the Windmill Pool (left) and the Engine Pool (right). At certain points there was bays to avoid the traffic. Also good for views of the lakes.

The only place cyclists are allowed to ride on was on the main roads. Currently cyclists can not ride their bikes around the paths around the lakes. But on Malthouse Lane it is fine as that is a road. Also has a pair of double yellow lines. On the right was a viewing area of the Engine Pool with a bench.

From the section along Valley Road, looking back at the side of the Engine Pool alongside Malthouse Lane.

It was all so peaceful going around the lakes. Other than the traffic on the roads.

Near the end of the Engine Pool walk and back to the car park.

Terry's Pool

The walk around Terry's Pool was more covered by trees, so harder to see the lake. Also the path would be rougher than around the Engine Pool. Here was the view just before the metal bridge that splits the Engine Pool from Terry's Pool.

With trees covering most of the Terry's Pool walk it was hard to see the pool, but there was some spots. And you could see some of the birds flying around here.

We went around Terry's Pool in a clockwise direction.

More of the same with the trees making reflections in the pool.

When going around you hardly realise that you have gone around it.

Some trees like this one was growing out of the pool!

Another tree covered view.

Here a tree branch slightly blocks the view of the pool here.

That could be the same tree in the pool, but seen from the other side.

Near the end of the Terry's Pool walk.

And with the metal bridge in view it would soon be time to cross it again to walk around the second half of the Engine Pool.

It was even possible to see Malthouse Lane in the distance beyond the metal bridge.

Windmill Pool

No walk around the Windmill Pool, just saw it from the road and bays on Malthouse Lane (opposite the Engine Pool).

Saw this red / white buoy / ball in the Windmill Pool. Made a nice reflection in the water.

This lake stretches quite far. Wasn't sure about walking around this one, as saw a sign on the gate from when the lockdown restrictions were tougher.

I would assume that the paths goes all the way around it. There are trees around at least three sides of this pool.

From Malthouse Lane could see that there was another bay for observing the pool on Valley Road.

This side of Malthouse Lane also had a big bay for watching the pool with benches as well. After this back around the last leg of the Engine Pool and back to the car park.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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