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Environment & green action
21 Nov 2019 - Karl Newton
Gallery

The wonderful colour changes of Autumn.

Karl 'people with passion' shares his wonderful Autumnal photography. The beautiful rich vibrant colours of Autumn.

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The wonderful colour changes of Autumn.





Karl 'people with passion' shares his wonderful Autumnal photography. The beautiful rich vibrant colours of Autumn.


 Birmingham - Worcester Canal, Edgbaston

 

Swanshurst Park, Birmingham

 

Moseley Park and Pool, Birmingham

 

 Birmingham - Worcester Canal, Edgbaston

 

Swanshurst Park, Birmingham

 

 Birmingham - Worcester Canal, Edgbaston

 

Temple Row, Birmingham

 

Brueton Park, Solihull, West Midlands

 

Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham 

 

Moseley Park and Pool, Birmingham

 

Grand Union Canal, Acocks Green, Birmingham

 

Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham

 

Autumn at Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham

 

Autumn at Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham

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30 passion points
History & heritage
19 Nov 2019 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

National Trust properties around the Midlands (Spring and Summer 2019)

On my National Trust membership card, been to many National Trust properties around the shire counties in the spring and summer of 2019. I was thinking about doing a post on the Cotswolds properties I went to, but here will stick to the Midlands (for now). Croome Court in Worcestershire. Canons Ashby in Northamptonshire. Farnborough Hall in Warwickshire. Berrington Hall in Herefordshire.

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National Trust properties around the Midlands (Spring and Summer 2019)





On my National Trust membership card, been to many National Trust properties around the shire counties in the spring and summer of 2019. I was thinking about doing a post on the Cotswolds properties I went to, but here will stick to the Midlands (for now). Croome Court in Worcestershire. Canons Ashby in Northamptonshire. Farnborough Hall in Warwickshire. Berrington Hall in Herefordshire.


Previous National Trust posts here: 

Croome Court

A visit to Croome Court during April 2019. This visit was near the end of the month. Located not far from Pershore in south Worcestershire at Croome D'Abitot. Croome Court is a mid-18th-century Neo-Palladian mansion. It is surrounded by parkland designed by Lancelot "Capability" Brown for the 6th Earl of Coventry. Some of the rooms were designed by Robert Adam. The house was built in 1751 - 52.

A look at some of the rooms inside. This was the Long Gallery. Most of the fixtures and fittings were sold in the 1940s, so most rooms are now used for temporary exhibitions. At the time was no exhibition in this room, but one was scheduled called "Can't see the trees for the wood". The interiors were done in about 1760.

This is The Golden Box in the Dining Room at Croome Court. There was A stunning display of Croome's porcelain by artist Bouke de Vries.

Back outside, and now on the path to the Chinese Bridge. Would soon cross over the Croome River.

Lakeside view of Croome Court. National Trust deckchairs to the right where you can sit and relax near the lake. Also an urn to the left of the deckchairs.

Distance from Birmingham: about 36 miles via the M5. Journey time in a car about 54 minutes. Postcode for SatNav: WR8 9DW. Rebecca Road, High Green.

Canons Ashby

On the May Day Bank Holiday Monday in early May 2019, we went to Canons Ashby House in Northamptonshire. It is a Grade I listed Elizabethan manor house located in the village of Canons Ashby. About 11 miles south of the town of Daventry. It has been owned by the National Trust since 1981, who have since restored it and done up the gardens. The house dates to the mid 16th century. It was the home of the Dryden family for many centuries.

A look inside Canons Ashby House. Photography was fine, as long as without a tripod or flash. The book room or Library. A pair of globes sitting on tables near the desk in the middle of the room.

This room was the Servants' Hall. With a long table and chairs in the middle. One of the rooms on the landing as we headed back downstairs.

Now back outside in the gardens. From the Top Terrace. Stunning flowerbeds with a multitude of colours. Spring is the perfect time to see colourful displays like this. May have been tulips out at that time of the year.

Further out in the gardens. Now on the Mulberry Lawn. The house having originally been built around 1550, was extended in 1590. It was embelished in 1632. The south front was remodelled in 1708 to 1710. The west range to the Green Court with the entrane dates to 1840.

Distance from Birmingham: about 61 miles via the M6 in a car. Should take just over an hour to get there. Postcode for SatNav: NN11 3SD. Canons Ashby, Daventry.

 

Farnborough Hall

A private residence, could not take interior photos, so only got the exteriors. Only open on Saturday and Wednesday afternoons on Bank Holidays. This visit on the way back home from Canons Ashby, during the early May Bank Holiday Monday back in May 2019. Farnborough Hall is a country house just within the border of Warwickshire, not far from Banbury (which is in Oxfordshire). It has been owned by the National Trust since 1960. Home of the Holbech family from 1684, although they first moved in around 1692. During WW1 and WW2 the hall was used as a auxiliary hospital. The main entrance into the hall was through that open door.

View of the drive a bit further back. The Clock Court is to the right. The hall is Grade I listed, while the Clock Court is Grade II listed. The way in from the car park is near the Clock Court. It was a Stableblock dating to the 18th century. Was remodelled in 1815 - 1816 by Henry Hakewill for William Holbech.

After a look around the house (I was unable to take photos inside as it was not allowed due to being a private residence). Went around the gardens having a look around.

From the lawn a bit further back looking at this side of the hall.

Further back after a walk down a path to a garden. Another look at the hall behind this field. Got to be careful of low lying tree branches, as I didn't see it one way, and hit my head (ouch). Even with a hat on (need a hard hat). Some places have low ceilings or door frames so have to be careful where I go on my travels.

Distance from Birmingham: about 48 miles along the M40 in a car. Journey would take around 52 minutes. From Canons Ashby it was about 13 miles along the A423, a journey time in the car of 26 minutes. Postcode for SatNav: . .

 

Berrington Hall

In an August 2019 visit to Berrington Hall. It is a  country house located about 3 miles north of  Leominster in Herefordshire. There was scaffolding on part of the hall due to the on going work to restore the dome. So when you head up the main staircase inside the hall, you see the scaffolding and wraps. Some light fittings had to be taken down at the time. It is a neoclassical country house building that Henry Holland designed in 1778-81 for Thomas Harley.

Heading to the main entrance for a look around the hall, through the big door, up the steps behind the four columns. Scaffolding to the right. Berrington features Capability Brown's last landscape design. You can head down the field through gates past sheep to the Berrington Hall. Best to do that after you have had a look around the hall first. Berrington has been in possession of the Cornewall family since 1386, but was taken over by the Harley family in 1775 who lived here for 95 years. In 1901 a Manchester businessman, Frederick Cawley MP, later Baron Cawley, purchased the estate. In 1957, the 3rd Lord Cawley transferred it to the Treasury, who in turn passed it onto the National Trust. Lady Cawley was allowed to live here until her death in 1978. A Grade I listed building since 1959.

A look around the interior of the hall. This was in the Library. To the left of the fireplace was a chessboard.

This is the Drawing Room. Chairs around the wall near a fireplace with a couple of mirrors in the room.

Back outside into the Courtyard. There was a tea room to the right and I think if I recall correctly the gift shop was to the left. Through the entrance way straight ahead was a former stables. One of which where you could buy an ice cream, or get a coffee. We later went to the Old Servants' Hall tea room (in the building to the right) down the basement for a coffee and slice of cake. After that, got an ice cream from the Stables cafe.

Distance from Birmingham: about 46 miles in the car taking 1 and a half hours via the A456. Postcode for the SatNav: . Leominster.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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70 passion points
Green open spaces
18 Nov 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Highbury Park through the seasons and the years between Kings Heath and Moseley

I first started getting photos of Highbury Park near Kings Heath and Moseley 10 years ago in December 2009. First proper venture into the park when it was all covered in snow to see Highbury Hall. The park was originally the grounds of the home of Joseph Chamberlain. He gave the park to the city before his death in 1914 and the park opened to the public in 1930.

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Highbury Park through the seasons and the years between Kings Heath and Moseley





I first started getting photos of Highbury Park near Kings Heath and Moseley 10 years ago in December 2009. First proper venture into the park when it was all covered in snow to see Highbury Hall. The park was originally the grounds of the home of Joseph Chamberlain. He gave the park to the city before his death in 1914 and the park opened to the public in 1930.


Highbury Park on Wikipedia. The park is the estate of Highbury Hall which was the former home of Joseph Chamberlain. Once the Mayor of Birmingham in the late 19th Century. He was later an MP. The hall is near the north east corner of the park on Yew Tree Road in Moseley (in the Moor Green area). Before he died he bequeathed the park to the people of Birmingham. The park finally opened to the public in 1930.

The Camp Hill Line is to the south of the park. Hopefully in a few years, Kings Heath Station will be rebuilt close to where The Gym and Homebase are now at the Findlay Road Retail Park.

The main entrance of the park is on the High Street in Kings Heath, close to Queensbridge Road. If you are coming from Kings Heath Park, you can also enter Highbury Park from Dad's Lane, in an entrance on Shutlock Lane. The other entrances and exits are on Moor Green Lane, and near the gatehouse lodge close to Yew Tree Road.

From here you can then walk towards Cannon Hill Park, either down Russell Road or head down Moor Green Lane and enter on Brockley Grove onto the Holders Lane Woods.

 

OK back to Highbury Park.

 

December 2009

The first time I got photos of Highbury Park was from early December 2009 from the High Street in Kings Heath, but I did not enter the park at this time as I wasn't ready. I probably headed up Queensbridge Road at the time.

The path down into the park. I would return a few weeks later after it had snowed.

About 4 days before Xmas Day I headed to the park, this time for an actual walk around. Back to the High Street, Kings Heath entrance (at this point hadn't used the other entrances). A bike near the caution sign.

The old brick wall. It would later be fully repaired years later.

One of the ponds in the park. Totally frozen and iced over.

The paths near Moor Green Lane and Shutlock Lane had a thin layer of snow over them. Evergreen trees behind trees that had shed their leaves.

I think the snow was completely frozen over the paths despite all the footprints and tyre marks from bikes. This path leads back to the old wall. The gardens of Highbury Hall are to the left of here.

Near the entrance / exit to Moor Green Lane, close to Yew Tree Road is this gatehouse / lodge. Now a private residence. Built around 1880 as part of the original approach to Highbury Hall. Part of the drive is still present. But most of the route is now covered by trees. Now the only main entrance to Highbury Hall is on Yew Tree Road.

January 2015

The next major time I visited Highbury Park with my camera was when there was these outdoor musical instruments that people could play with (especially young kids). This one looked like a harp.

A carved wooden bench.

Another wooden bench. Notice that they both have flowers carved into them.

Can you play? Can you play loud or quiet? - Dynamics. Can you play long or short notes? Duration. This is what it says on each one of these musical instruments.

A bit closer up. Not really sure how they work.

A wooden circle. Birmingham's very on "Stone Henge" or more like "Wood Henge" in Highbury Park.

Stone hall in a triangular piece of stone. Again not fully sure what you are supposed to do with this, maybe say something through the hole and another person may hear you?

August 2018

Heading down Dad's Lane towards the Shutlock Lane entrane of the park. Saw this National Express West Midlands single decker bus on the 27 bus route. It would also pass Kings Heath Park.

Saw a Land Rover Series II in the car park.

Mocha Moo Cafe was at The Great Big Pet Picnic. Here people could get food and drink while with their pets in this field.

The leaves were lush and green in the middle of August 2018. And the ponds made some nice reflections and ripples.

The pond is also known as the Fish Pond. Many birds are to be seen around here.

Saw this heron pirched on a branches of a tree that was over the pond.

Trees in a wood and early signs of the autumn to come.

Almost the middle of August, and leaves were already falling off trees, and it wasn't yet September!

Yet the leaves on the trees were still green. Apart from the leaves that had already fallen.

August 2019

Heading round the back of the old brick wall. Now fully restored, after part of it was damaged. Signs of graffiti, but faint.

Getting closer to the wall. Trees all full of green leaves at this point. This was near the end of August 2019.

Here you can see evidence of the brick wall repairs. Looking as good as new.

A grass path amongst the trees. I didn't head up this one.

Reflections in the pond. Leaves still lush and green before autumn came.

A Common moorhen seen in the Fish Pond. The odd leaf had fallen into the pond. And the fishes are just about visible close to the surface. At least I think they are fishes!

Several flower beds with roses. Close to the Shutlock Lane and Moor Green Lane exit.

After this I headed down Moor Green Lane and went into Cannon Hill Park via the Holders Lane Woods. In late summer, there is usually a fun fair on the fairground in Cannon Hill Park, which I saw on my walk towards Edgbaston Road. You can even start your three parks walk in Kings Heath Park and walk through Highbury Park and then into Cannon Hill Park. Ending up near the Cricket Ground.

 

For more of my Highbury Park photos, please check out my Flickr album here Highbury Park.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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70 passion points
Green open spaces
14 Nov 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Rookery Park in Erdington: once the site of Erdington Town Hall

I initally went past Rookery Park in Erdington back in January 2019 on Wood End Road, and have only just got around to having a look round the park in November 2019. Was very autumnal on my visit. Rookery House is derelict and under scaffolding. Hopefully the house is being restored. There is also a couple of derelict toilet buildings in the park, boarded up covered in graffiti.

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Rookery Park in Erdington: once the site of Erdington Town Hall





I initally went past Rookery Park in Erdington back in January 2019 on Wood End Road, and have only just got around to having a look round the park in November 2019. Was very autumnal on my visit. Rookery House is derelict and under scaffolding. Hopefully the house is being restored. There is also a couple of derelict toilet buildings in the park, boarded up covered in graffiti.


Rookery Park is a small park located in Erdington between Wood End Road and Western Road. You can catch the no 11A or 11C buses to the park. The park is bounded by Kingsbury Road to the east and Rollason Road to the west.

Some history taken from Rookery Park and House, Birmingham, which by the looks of it was taken from Bill Dargue - Erdington's page.

The house in Rookery Park was originally known as Birches Green House. Built in the early Georgian period around 1730 by Birmingham ironmaster Abraham Spooner. He moved to Elmdon Hall in 1760 and his son Isaac and family lived here until Abraham's death in 1789 when they moved to Elmdon. William Wilberforce planned his antislavery campaigns in this park. He married a member of the family Dorothy Spooner. Later Birmingham's first Tory MP, Richard Spooner was born here in 1783.

The glass manufacturer Brueton Gibbons lived in Rookery House from 1816. From 1871 the house was leased by William Wiley. Rookery House became Erdington's Council House after 1894 until 1911 when Erdington became part of Birmingham.

The Council had used it until about 2008 for council services, but in recent years it's become derelict. Now under scaffolding, the house is being converted into flats.

 

I first passed the park on Wood End Road in January 2019, but a Asian wedding party was there for their photos, so I didn't enter at this time. Took me until November 2019 until I actually travelled back to Erdington.

January 2019

Just passing the park as I walked up Wood End Road towards the Erdington High Street. A wedding car was on the road, and was an Asian wedding party there for their photos, so I didn't want to disturb them, so carried on up the road.

Saw this derelict gents building behind fences, the doors boarded up. The window frames rotten. I don't think it's changed condition in the last year or so.

November 2019

Entered the park via the gate on Wood End Road in Erdington, I had just seen an Emirates Airbus A380 coming into land at Birmingham Airport (missing getting the photo by the time I entered the park). I took the right path towards Rookery House.

Leaves on the lawn, trees shedded their leaves. Not too bad at this point as it was before the forecast rain.

Looking very autumnal as I headed round the path.

Another old toilet block. All the doors and windows were bricked up, and covered in recent graffiti.

First look at Rookery House. I was hoping to see it looking like it's former self. Maybe after the restoration is complete.

A formal garden in front of the house. But nothing much in the flower beds at this time of the year. Like Pype Hayes Park, I hope that the house is fully restored, and perhaps given a use to the public. As flats it would be for private residents.

Then I saw this playground to the left.

Heading up the path towards Western Road. Car park to the right.

Looking back at the field of leaves and trees. My path taken was on the left.

Just before exiting at Western Road, pair of paths. I used the one on the left. Another path on the right also leads back to Wood End Road.

From here, checking Google Maps, left Western Road via Rollason Road and Church Road. Leading to the Erdington High Street. After a coffee stop, I went towards Erdington Station, but the rain started by then. Another possible park to visit it Witton Lakes Park, if the weather is better.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Photography
12 Nov 2019 - Karl Newton
Gallery

The wonderful colour changes of Autumn

Karl 'people with passion' shares his wonderful Autumnal photography. The beautiful rich vibrant colours of Autumn.

Related

The wonderful colour changes of Autumn





Karl 'people with passion' shares his wonderful Autumnal photography. The beautiful rich vibrant colours of Autumn.


 Birmingham - Worcester Canal, Edgbaston

 

Swanshurst Park, Birmingham

 

Moseley Park and Pool, Birmingham

 

 Birmingham - Worcester Canal, Edgbaston

 

Swanshurst Park, Birmingham

 

 Birmingham - Worcester Canal, Edgbaston

 

Temple Row, Birmingham

 

Brueton Park, Solihull, West Midlands

 

Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham 

 

Moseley Park and Pool, Birmingham

 

Grand Union Canal, Acocks Green, Birmingham

 

Cannon Hill Park, Birmingham

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60 passion points

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