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History & heritage
08 Aug 2019 - Elliott Brown
Did you know?

Moseley Hall Hospital and Moseley Park: Birmingham Heritage Week, September 2016

Back during the Birmingham Heritage Week of September 2016, on the 11th September 2016 I went to Moseley Hall Hospital, starting off at the Dovecote and Cow House. Then walking towards Moseley Hall Hospital. On the open day Moseley Park was open, so didn't need a key (I'm not a resident). In the park I had a look in the Ice House.

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Moseley Hall Hospital and Moseley Park: Birmingham Heritage Week, September 2016





Back during the Birmingham Heritage Week of September 2016, on the 11th September 2016 I went to Moseley Hall Hospital, starting off at the Dovecote and Cow House. Then walking towards Moseley Hall Hospital. On the open day Moseley Park was open, so didn't need a key (I'm not a resident). In the park I had a look in the Ice House.


Walking down from Kings Heath along the Alcester Road, I entered via the service road to Moseley Hall Hospital, and sat on a bench until the Dovecote and Cow House were opened, sometime after 2pm on Sunday 11th September 2016.

The estate was farmland back in the 18th century surrounding Moseley Hall. Eventually the land was sold to the City of Birmingham and housing built around the estate.

After the Dissolution of the Monasteries the Moseley estate ended up with the Grevis family who rebuilt the hall in the early 1600s. In 1768 it was sold to the banker John Taylor, His son John built a new house in the plain classical style. In 1889 the estate was sold to Richard Cadbury of the chocolate making family. In 1891 Cadbury presented Moseley Hall to the City of Birmingham. It is now a NHS community hospital.

The Dovecote

The Dovecote is a Grade II listed building. Made of brick, tiled roof with wooden lantern and finial. It dates to the 18th century. I had a look around outside before it opened.

You head up some wooden steps and then you can have a look inside. This was the first building I went up shortly after 2pm when they unlocked the door. A look up to the wooden ceiling.

Cow House

The next building I looked at was the Cow House, seen here before they unlocked the door. A Grade II listed building described as the Building to the North East of the Dovecote. Built in the 18th century, brick with a slate roof.

Once the door was unlocked a look at the ground floor. There was also steps up to the area above. Like all places like this, you go up the steps, but have to reverse down them, a bit like in various old mills I've been too. Was various old bits and bobs upstairs.

Moseley Hall Hospital

After the Dovecote and Cow House, I walked down to the old hall, now a hospital. Moseley Hall Hospital is a Grade II listed building. It was built in about 1790. It was Richard Cadbury's home until he gave it to the City to be Children's Home in 1890. Made of Ashlar with a slate roof. Has a porch with 4 pairs of Tuscan columns.

I previously posted the below photo in this post Cadbury Brothers: George and Richard Cadbury.

I did briefly pop inside, but decided there was nothing worth taking photos of, so I next set off for Moseley Park. Saw this side view of Moseley Hall Hospital on the way. Heading down the grass bank to the busy Salisbury Road, was tricky finding somewhere to safely cross the road, before heading through the open gate into the park.

For more photos taken at Moseley Old Hospital, check out my album on Flickr.

The Ice House in Moseley Park

First up a look a the Ice House, the main reason for going into Moseley Park. The Ice House was built in the 18th century to store blocks of ice for Moseley Hall. One of the volunteers said that even ice shipped over from America via the UK's canal system was stored here. Even now, if you put ice down here, it will stay frozen! The Ice House is a Grade II listed building. Dates to the late 18th century, built of brick.

A look inside and down the Ice House. It has a ladder there, but don't think you can go down there. Worth a look though. Subterranean structure under slight earth mound. Domed brick chamber of about 16ft deep.The chamber is, at least partly, of cavity brick construction.

Moseley Pool

At the time I also had a look around the park. One of the many paths and trees here. Leading to the Moseley Pool.

Usually only locals that live in the area with a key would get to see this pool of water. But on the Heritage Open Day, anyone could see it.

Looks so tranquil and peaceful, hard to believe that this is in Moseley! Between Salisbury Road, Alcester Road and Chantry Road.

A Boat House on the Moseley Pool. The gates are on Salisbury Road and Alcester Road. Both are normally locked. They also have music festivals in this park (I've never been).

For more photos taken at Moseley Park, check out my album on Flickr.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Environment & green action
05 Aug 2019 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Parks around the no 11 Outer Circle Bus Route: from Kings Heath Park to Swanshurst Park and beyond

If you catch the 11A or 11C buses as frequently as I do, then you would know that there is plenty of parks to visit around the Outer Circle. Here we will look at some of the parks along the route. Not all visited at the same time of course. There is parks in Kings Heath, Bournville, Selly Oak and other places along the route.

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Parks around the no 11 Outer Circle Bus Route: from Kings Heath Park to Swanshurst Park and beyond





If you catch the 11A or 11C buses as frequently as I do, then you would know that there is plenty of parks to visit around the Outer Circle. Here we will look at some of the parks along the route. Not all visited at the same time of course. There is parks in Kings Heath, Bournville, Selly Oak and other places along the route.


Swanshurst Park

This is the park I normally pass first heading up the 11C on Swanshurst Lane in Moseley. Would also normally pass it heading down in the 11A from Kings Heath. Swanshurst Park is the home of the Moseley New Pool. Where you would see many Canada geese, swans, ducks etc in the pool. They are also sometimes to be found on the grass bank near Swanshurst Lane. Photo from March 2011 when Zippos Circus was in town.

Kings Heath Park

I normally get the 11C towards Kings Heath Park, and the 11A back from it. The park is on Vicarage Road a short walk from the Town Centre / High Street of Kings Heath. It's next door to King Edward VI Camp Hill Schools. Photo from February 2018, around a month after the Magical Lantern Festival had vacated the park, and the grass had to grow back (it moved back to the Botanical Gardens for Xmas 2018).

Cotteridge Park

This park isn't visible from the roads that the 11A or 11C buses goes on, but if you get off on the Pershore Road or Watford Road in Cotteridge, this park is a short walk away. Seen below in early August 2018, I would get off the 11C on the Pershore Road, then walk up Breedon Road and cross the bridge over the Cross City Line into Cotteridge Park. You can exit / enter also on Franklin Road. Head left towards Bournville and Linden Road, or right towards Bournville Station and Mary Vale Park.

Bournville Park

This small park in Bournville is near the Linden Road and is opposite the Cadbury Factory playing field. This view from August 2012 shows The Bourn that flows through the park. The park has a bowling green and a tennis court. The park ends at Selly Oak Road and Oak Tree Lane. You can continue your walk into the Valley Parkway along the Merritts Brook Greenway. Also suitable for cyclists.

Selly Oak Park

You can get off the 11A or 11C buses on the Harborne Lane in Selly Oak to visit this park. It is also near Gibbins Road. My first visit (photo below) during June 2012. Selly Oak Park is close to the site of the Lapal Canal, and over the years a section in the park has been restored, but the canal is not yet ready to be completed to be reconnected to the Worcester & Birmingham Canal. Recently the new Selly Oak Shopping Park opened during autumn / winter 2018. If you continue beyond the park along Gibbins Road, you end up near Lodge Hill Cemetery.

Grove Park, Harborne

I first went to Grove Park in Harborne during May 2012. You get off the bus on the Harborne Park Road. The park is also bordered by Mill Farm Road, Grove Lane and Old Church Road. In November 2018 I found the blue plaque of Alderman W. Byng Kenrick, which states that he gave the Grove Estate to the City. It was near the Kenrick Centre on Mill Farm Road. This park also has a pond.

Lightwoods Park, Bearwood

This park is usually the furthest that I normally go on the 11C, getting off the bus on Lordswood Road. Bearwood is within Sandwell, and is part of Smethwick. Lightwoods Park was managed by Birmingham City Council hence the likes of the bandstand (pictured restored as of November 2017) having the coat of arms of Birmingham. Management of the park was handed over to Sandwell Metropolitan Borough Council in 2010. In recent years Lightwoods House has been fully restored, as has the Shakespeare Garden nearby. The park is on the Hagley Road West, not far from Edgbaston and Harborne.

Summerfield Park

I once ended up in Summerfield Park after completing my second half walk of the Harborne Walkway during February 2016. The path leads to the Dudley Road near Winson Green. The 11A / 11C do go past here, although I've never gotten those buses this far around. But I have been past on the 87 towards Smethwick and Dudley. The park is also close to the Edgbaston Reservoir and the Birmingham Canal Navigations Mainline (as well as the railway between Birmingham and Wolverhampton). Icknield Port Road runs down one side of the park. Near the top right corner is a derelict Police Station building. Was the former Summerfield Police Station before they moved to new building on Icknield Port Road.

Rookery Park, Erdington

During my early January 2019 walk from Bromford Bridge up the Bromford Lane towards Wood End Road in Erdington, I went past Rookery Park on my way towards Erdington Town Centre. Didn't pop in, but took this shot on the way past. Don't usually get the 11A as far as Erdington, but around the December 2018 / January 2019 period, I decided to see how long it would take to get the bus on the Outer Circle to Erdington. It is faster though to get one of the Express buses back into the City Centre, or the train from either Chester Road or Erdington Station.

Old Yardley Park

Another park not visible from the 11A or 11C bus routes, but you can get off the bus on Stoney Lane in Yardley near Blakesley Road to walk to this park. One way is to Blakesley Hall, and the other leads to Old Yardley Village via Church Road. This photo from my January 2017 visit to Old Yardley Park in a stones throw view of the spire of St Edburgha's Church. The park is bordered by Church Road and Queens Road in Yardley.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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50 passion points
Photography
31 Jul 2019 - Karl Newton
Gallery

Green spaces - Hidden Gems!

Take a look at some of the Inner City green spaces we have, from the Secret Garden - Birmingham Library, St Philips Cathedral, Centenary Square to St Paul's Square in the Jewellery Quarter. All Hidden Gems!

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Green spaces - Hidden Gems!





Take a look at some of the Inner City green spaces we have, from the Secret Garden - Birmingham Library, St Philips Cathedral, Centenary Square to St Paul's Square in the Jewellery Quarter. All Hidden Gems!


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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60 passion points
Environment & green action
25 Jul 2019 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

The Shire Country Park from the Stratford Road to Scribers Lane in Hall Green / Yardley Wood

This hidden parkland with walking paths is between Hall Green and Yardley Wood. Named after JRR Tolkien's The Shire from The Hobbit. The route takes you past Sarehole Mill. Then eventually through The Dingles and Trittiford Mill Pool. You don't have to do it all in one go. Even good for winter walks. Plenty of wildlife around too!

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The Shire Country Park from the Stratford Road to Scribers Lane in Hall Green / Yardley Wood





This hidden parkland with walking paths is between Hall Green and Yardley Wood. Named after JRR Tolkien's The Shire from The Hobbit. The route takes you past Sarehole Mill. Then eventually through The Dingles and Trittiford Mill Pool. You don't have to do it all in one go. Even good for winter walks. Plenty of wildlife around too!


Greet Mill Meadows

The River Cole with it's waterfall seen in the Greet Mill Meadows section of the Shire Country Park during April 2009. Seen from the road bridge. This is on the no 6 bus route, also the no 1 and now 1A passes over this part of the Stratford Road. The Millstream Way heads along the River Cole towards Sarehole Mill.

The flooded ford of the River Cole that crosses Green Road in Hall Green. Seen during March 2018. There is a footbridge for pedestrians. Cars though have to drive through the river. When flooded, they sometimes get stuck here! This is between the Greet Mill Meadows and the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground.

Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground

This view of the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground during March 2018 with new gravel footpath. The path leads towards Green Road and the flooded ford. The other direction leads to Sarehole Mill and Cole Bank Road (on the 11A / 11C and no 5 bus routes). On the Moseley / Hall Green border.

John Morris Jones Walkway

Seen during January 2011 from the Brook Lane end, this path leads towards the Cole Bank Road in Hall Green. That winter I found the path too muddy, so I didn't walk all the way. Usually better along here during the spring and summer months. It follows the path of the River Cole.

The Dingles

This section of the Shire Country Park goes from Brook Lane towards Highfield Road on the Hall Green / Yardley Wood border. Seen here during a sunny March 2012. The River Cole and the Chinn Brook both flow through this area. When you get to Highfield Road, you have a choice: either head through the Chinn Brook Recreation Ground, or go around the Trittiford Mill Pool.

Trittiford Mill Pool

The perfect place for a Christmas Day morning was was the Trittiford Mill Pool. Near Highfield Road and Priory Road in Yardley Wood. This was on the 25th December 2013. You can walk all the way around the lake, going past the River Cole. Many bird species to see. The usual gulls, swans, geese, ducks etc. The footpath was resurfaced in 2016. I even popped along when there was snow here during December 2017 (looked quite wintery).

Scribers Lane

Beyond the Trittiford Mill Pool is Scribers Lane. This section seen during a walk in May 2016. Scribers Lane starts at the end of the Mill Pool, then heads towards Slade Lane alongside the River Cole. Beyond is more parkland that follows the Shakespeare line south of Yardley Wood Station, but I'm not sure if you can walk through the overgrowth, but it leads to Colebrook Road over in Solihull.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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50 passion points
Photography
23 Jul 2019 - Karl Newton
Gallery

Eastside Park Birmingham

Eastside Park is located in the Eastside of Birmingham.

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Eastside Park Birmingham





Eastside Park is located in the Eastside of Birmingham.


 

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