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GreenActionWithYou – A FreeTimePays community

Protecting our environment

Green Action with You is all about promoting and supporting social value, providing a shared digital space where people can showcase what they do and can together make a difference by helping to protect their environment.

Launch date: June 2019
Combined FreeTimePays following: 101K


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Green open spaces
Displaying until 01 Sep 2021 - FreeTimePays
Featuring

Love our parks - get involved!

As Lockdown rules start to enable more people to enjoy their parks and green spaces, we all want to ensure that these wonderful places of natural beauty are protected for all to enjoy.  This community collective will share some of the brilliant initiatives running across the UK and show just how, together, we can make a difference for the benefit of all.  Connect with us.

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Love our parks - get involved!





As Lockdown rules start to enable more people to enjoy their parks and green spaces, we all want to ensure that these wonderful places of natural beauty are protected for all to enjoy.  This community collective will share some of the brilliant initiatives running across the UK and show just how, together, we can make a difference for the benefit of all.  Connect with us.


Over the next month and for the remainder of 2020, we will be growing our reach and pull together information and details on all the great work being carried out across communities as they collectively protect their parks.  

This will grow into a massive 'community-led' resource for people with a shared interest and passion for their local parks and green spaces.  

Here's just a few of the ideas and initiatives we will be telling you more about so we can share and get more people actively involved.

Litter picking groups - they do a fantastic job.  We'll connect you with your local group.

Art & Culture Trail.  We'll help you set up your trail and showcase your parks.

Walking clubs. We'll connect you and bring in more friends.

Park angels.  Volunteering with a difference.  We'll tell you more.

Creativity and green spaces collide.  Let's look at how art, music, photography and creativity in all its forms can help promote and protect our parks. 

Parks and mental health.  A walk, ride or jog in the park can do so much for your mental health.

There's something for everyone.

Connect with us and help us protect our parks. 

 

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60 passion points
Rivers, lakes & canals
11 minutes ago - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The Ariel Aqueduct on the Worcester & Birmingham Canal in Selly Oak

The Ariel Aqueduct was built alongside a railway viaduct on the Cross City Line in Selly Oak when the Selly Oak Bypass was built, which opened in 2011. It carries the Worcester & Birmingham Canal. The towpath is suitable for walking, cycling and taking your dog for a walk, as well as going for a run. You can also see trains going past. Below is the Aston Webb Boulevard.

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The Ariel Aqueduct on the Worcester & Birmingham Canal in Selly Oak





The Ariel Aqueduct was built alongside a railway viaduct on the Cross City Line in Selly Oak when the Selly Oak Bypass was built, which opened in 2011. It carries the Worcester & Birmingham Canal. The towpath is suitable for walking, cycling and taking your dog for a walk, as well as going for a run. You can also see trains going past. Below is the Aston Webb Boulevard.


Ariel Aqueduct

When the Selly Oak Bypass (later to be named as the Aston Webb Boulevard) was built in Selly Oak during 2010 to 2011, it meant that an aqueduct had to built on the Worcester & Birmingham Canal, as well as a railway viaduct on the Cross City Line. The nearby wasteland used to be where the Battery Works used to be. With the completion of the first phase of the bypass, it meant that the University of Birmingham could build new student accommodation nearby to the aqueduct. Further up the bypass, the land had to be decontaminated, as there used to be a landfill there. Eventually the Selly Oak Shopping Park and a student accommodation block was opened in late 2018. And the rest of the land (still to be built on) will be for the Life Sciences Park of the University of Birmingham. Meanwhile since Sainsbury's moved to the new shopping park, it meant that work could start on extending the bypass to Selly Oak Triangle (started in 2019 but is not yet complete).

I used to be able to get onto the Worcester & Birmingham Canal down a road off the Bristol Road near a car showroom. But there is now new steps closed to the Unite student accommodation (as well as a shortcut to Sainsbury's and the new shopping park). Then walk as far as the University of Birmingham before getting off the canal.

 

View below of the Ariel Aqueduct from the Aston Webb Boulevard (Selly Oak Bypass) during September 2012. Leading towards Queen Elizabeth Island and New Fosse Way. The new Birmingham Super Hospital opened in 2010, so these new roads helped give access to it (the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham).

The views of the Ariel Aqueduct taken during February 2013. This was during a walk along the canal from Selly Oak to the University of Birmingham.

The towpath turns slightly to the right as you head onto the aqueduct.

Saw a man in green running past me. Best to stop and let them pass you.

From here you can see the railway viaduct on the right. If you are lucky you could see some trains passing by!

Some nice reflections from the railings. You can only get to the other side in a narrowboat.

In January 2014, could see the completed Victoria Hall from the Ariel Aqueduct next to Old Joe.

Within a few years of the completion of the bypass several student accommodation blocks got built down there.

Jarratt Hall is seen to the right of the aqueduct.

The view of the bypass. The University of Birmingham is on the left. The Bournbrook area of Selly Oak is on the right.

The view below taken during August 2017. It always feels weird walking over the aqueduct. It's so high up above the bypass.

In this February 2019 view, I caught a view of the Ariel Aqueduct from a train passing over the railway viaduct.

In August 2019 on another walk over the Ariel Aqueduct, saw a cyclist going past me. The grass and trees more grown by this point.

Went over it again during January 2020. This time a cyclist in orange was coming towards me.

From the other side, caught a Class 323 West Midlands Railway train passing over that railway bridge. Touch Base Pears seen behind.

For another post on aqueducts in the West Midlands region go to this post on the Wootton Wawen & Edstone Aqueducts on the Stratford-on-Avon Canal in Warwickshire.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Rivers, lakes & canals
22 hours ago - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

The Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and Windmill Pool at Earlswood Lakes

A visit to Earlswood Lakes near Solihull in June 2020. Built as canal feeder reservoirs for the Stratford-on-Avon Canal, they are within the Stratford-on-Avon District of Warwickshire. Three pools including the Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and Windmill Pool. Built in the 1820s. Also here is the Earlswood Engine House built in 1821 to pump water to the canal. Good for walks.

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The Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and Windmill Pool at Earlswood Lakes





A visit to Earlswood Lakes near Solihull in June 2020. Built as canal feeder reservoirs for the Stratford-on-Avon Canal, they are within the Stratford-on-Avon District of Warwickshire. Three pools including the Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and Windmill Pool. Built in the 1820s. Also here is the Earlswood Engine House built in 1821 to pump water to the canal. Good for walks.


Earlswood Lakes

A visit to Earlswood Lakes for a morning walk on the 8th June 2020. I'd never been here before as The Lakes Station on the Shakespeare Line is a request stop, so hadn't got around to going here (I had previous got a train to Earlswood Station and gone to Earlswood Garden & Landscape Centre but no further). Ended up going in the car. The car park on Wood Lane were open again and is a good starting point for a walk around the lakes.

The Earlswood Lakes are three man made reservoirs built in the 1820s in Earlswood, Warwickshire to supply water to the nearby Stratford-on-Avon Canal. Which goes from Kings Norton Junction (from the Worcester & Birmingham Canal in Kings Norton) to Bancroft Basin in Stratford-upon-Avon. Construction took 5 years and some of the labour force included prisoners of war from the Napoleonic Wars. Being that it was so close to Birmingham, the lakes was popular from visitors from the city from the early 1900s. The Lakes Station nearby would get visitors on the Shakespeare Line from Birmingham to Stratford-upon-Avon (although today it is a request stop). Is about a 15 minute walk away. The car park at Earlswood Lakes is free.

There is three pools here, the Engine Pool, Terry's Pool and the Windmill Pool. There is also the Grade II listed Engine House next to the Engine Pool. The lakes are good for walking, fishing and sailing. You would find a variety of wildlife here, plus there is also a nearby Craft Centre.

 

The walk we did was started around the Engine Pool. Then went around Terry's Pool. Completed the second part of the Engine Pool. Then passed the Windmill Pool (but didn't go around it). Cycling around Earlswood Lakes is not currently allowed. So cyclists must stick to the main roads only.

 

Earlswood Engine House

The Engine House was built in 1821 and is a Grade II listed building. It is near the car park on Wood Lane and can also be seen from Valley Road and from the Engine Pool. It had a steam engine which pumped water from Earlswood Lakes to the nearby Stratford-on-Avon Canal. This view was over the fence from the car park.

There was also views of the Engine House from the other side of the Engine Pool. Built of red brick, it also has a low pitched Welsh slate roof.

This close up view of the Engine House from the Engine Pool, not far from Valley Road. I think it is no longer in use. But there is also a white plaque to the left hand side of the building.

Engine Pool

First up a walk around the Engine Pool at Earlswood Lakes. We headed to the right, starting from the car park.

There is a metal footbridge with a dam between the Engine Pool and Terry's Pool.

The water in the lake had receeded quite a bit. This was only a week or so after the May heatwave had ended.

Some parts of the Engine Pool had these old wooden decking. Some could do with repairing.

Crossing the metal footbridge between the Engine Pool (left) and Terry's Pool (right).

These wooden steps to the Engine Pool look broken. In need of repair.

With the water so low at the time, people could walk on the banks of the reservoir. After the walk around Terry's Pool, we resumed the walk around the Engine Pool towards Malthouse Lane.

Later on was crossing Malthouse Lane between the Windmill Pool (left) and the Engine Pool (right). At certain points there was bays to avoid the traffic. Also good for views of the lakes.

The only place cyclists are allowed to ride on was on the main roads. Currently cyclists can not ride their bikes around the paths around the lakes. But on Malthouse Lane it is fine as that is a road. Also has a pair of double yellow lines. On the right was a viewing area of the Engine Pool with a bench.

From the section along Valley Road, looking back at the side of the Engine Pool alongside Malthouse Lane.

It was all so peaceful going around the lakes. Other than the traffic on the roads.

Near the end of the Engine Pool walk and back to the car park.

Terry's Pool

The walk around Terry's Pool was more covered by trees, so harder to see the lake. Also the path would be rougher than around the Engine Pool. Here was the view just before the metal bridge that splits the Engine Pool from Terry's Pool.

With trees covering most of the Terry's Pool walk it was hard to see the pool, but there was some spots. And you could see some of the birds flying around here.

We went around Terry's Pool in a clockwise direction.

More of the same with the trees making reflections in the pool.

When going around you hardly realise that you have gone around it.

Some trees like this one was growing out of the pool!

Another tree covered view.

Here a tree branch slightly blocks the view of the pool here.

That could be the same tree in the pool, but seen from the other side.

Near the end of the Terry's Pool walk.

And with the metal bridge in view it would soon be time to cross it again to walk around the second half of the Engine Pool.

It was even possible to see Malthouse Lane in the distance beyond the metal bridge.

Windmill Pool

No walk around the Windmill Pool, just saw it from the road and bays on Malthouse Lane (opposite the Engine Pool).

Saw this red / white buoy / ball in the Windmill Pool. Made a nice reflection in the water.

This lake stretches quite far. Wasn't sure about walking around this one, as saw a sign on the gate from when the lockdown restrictions were tougher.

I would assume that the paths goes all the way around it. There are trees around at least three sides of this pool.

From Malthouse Lane could see that there was another bay for observing the pool on Valley Road.

This side of Malthouse Lane also had a big bay for watching the pool with benches as well. After this back around the last leg of the Engine Pool and back to the car park.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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70 passion points
Green open spaces
13 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Mill Lodge Park not far from Shirley Station

There is a small park not too far from Shirley Station. Called either Mill Lodge Park (according to Google Maps) or the Colebrook Recreation Ground. Located on Green Lane and Aqueduct Road in Solihull. The River Cole flows through the park. To the north is the Aqueduct Road Meadow Local Wildlife Site. Beyond that you can walk into the Shire Country Park on the Birmingham Solihull border.

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Mill Lodge Park not far from Shirley Station





There is a small park not too far from Shirley Station. Called either Mill Lodge Park (according to Google Maps) or the Colebrook Recreation Ground. Located on Green Lane and Aqueduct Road in Solihull. The River Cole flows through the park. To the north is the Aqueduct Road Meadow Local Wildlife Site. Beyond that you can walk into the Shire Country Park on the Birmingham Solihull border.


Mill Lodge Park

Mill Lodge Park is quite close to Mill Lodge Primary School and the Coronation Youth and Community Centre. It is on Green Lane and Aqueduct Road in Shirley, Solihull. It is also known as the Colebrook Recreation Ground. The River Cole flows through the park, and it is a short walk away from Shirley Station, which is on Haslucks Green Road. The Aqueduct Road Meadow Local Wildlife Site is to the north and runs towards Colebrook Road.

Beyond the park you can walk up Nethercote Gardens. If you cross over some stepping stones on a stream, you leave Solihull and enter Birmingham, and will then be in the Scribers Lane SINC of the Shire Country Park. This follows the route of the River Cole as well.

2017

A look at Mill Lodge Park during April 2017 from the Green Lane entrance. Also the entrance to the car park from the right.

A look at the River Cole from the bridge on Green Lane.

The grass was mown short and was wooden bollards near here. I entered the park at the time from the Aqueduct Road entrance.

The path heading towards the Aqueduct Road Meadow.

Getting close to the footbridge that crosses the River Cole. The Aqueduct Road Meadow is to the left of here.

There is sign all about the Aqeuduct Road Meadow Local Wildlife Site. Love Nature.

About to cross the footbridge over the River Cole.

A look at the River Cole on the side of Mill Lodge Park.

Also the other side of the River Cole on the side of the Aqueduct Road Meadow. Towards Colebrook Road.

First look at the Colebrook Recreation Ground Play Area.

Some kind of tyre swing on a steel bar.

2020

Popped back into Mill Lodge Park back in January 2020, after I went to find the pond at Priory Fields. Entering the park again from Aqueduct Road.

Different conditions to my last visit here when I crossed the footbridge over the River Cole. It was winter, the trees were bare and the grass was different near the river banks.

The path into Mill Lodge Park alongside the River Cole.

A look at the playground again.

Some kind of peddle bike that kids can go round in circle on.

Seesaw, swings and a slide in the play area.

It was a bit wet and soggy at the time. But this was back when it was still OK to use playgrounds.

The bridge on Green Lane over the River Cole looking towards the new housing estate off Aqueduct Road.

Also a look at the car park to Mill Lodge Park from Green Lane.

Went back for a lockdown walk in May 2020. Starting at Mill Lodge Park and following the River Cole towards the Scribers Lane SINC in the Shire Country Park and back. First up a look at the River Cole from the lower path in the park.

There is two paths here. The path on the left that I was on is near the River Cole. The path on the right was close to the playing field. Some people were playing football or sitting on the grass.

Over the great lockdown, there had been a lot of growth in the parkland all over the West Midlands. And at Mill Lodge Park that was no exception. Cow parsley seen growing near the River Cole and the Aqueduct Road Meadow.

The scene had changed a lot in the months since I was last here. This River Cole view of the Aqueduct Road Meadow towards Colebrook Road.

River Cole view with the footbridge towards the football field.

Now on the path toward Colebrook Road in the Aqueduct Road Meadow area.

About halfway to Colebrook Road.

Getting close to Colebrook Road. After this we would cross over the road onto Nethercote Gardens and continue the walk into the Scribers Lane SINC (over some stepping stones). You have to remember that May was hot and sunny all month long, and very dry.

Later back to Colebrook Road and a look at the River Cole with all those trees. Just before going back onto the path alongside the Aqueduct Road Meadow.

Now back on the path in the Aqueduct Road Meadow. Some cow parsley on both sides.

Was still people playing football in the field over there.

Back in the car park before we left Mill Lodge Park. A wonderful blue sky and sunshine. Why didn't May's weather stay into June and July?

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
13 Jul 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

From Moseley Bog towards Windermere Park

Back in April 2020, earlier in the lockdown, we had a walk around Moseley Bog. Starting from the Sarehole Mill Car Park via the Recreation Ground and Green Road ford. We entered the bog as usual from Pensby Close (off Wake Green Road). Around the usual decking. Ending up in Windermere Park, before the walk back down Wake Green Road to the starting point.

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From Moseley Bog towards Windermere Park





Back in April 2020, earlier in the lockdown, we had a walk around Moseley Bog. Starting from the Sarehole Mill Car Park via the Recreation Ground and Green Road ford. We entered the bog as usual from Pensby Close (off Wake Green Road). Around the usual decking. Ending up in Windermere Park, before the walk back down Wake Green Road to the starting point.


Moseley Bog

Welcome to my second post on Moseley Bog. Almost forgot about this one. Then saw a piece on BBC Midlands Today on the 8th July 2020, reminding me of the last walk around the Bog back in early April 2020. During the first few weeks of the lockdown.

You can find my original post on Moseley Bog here: Moseley Bog from my 2012 and 2016 visits.

I previously posted some of my April 2020 photos in this post here: J. R. R. Tolkien in Sarehole from 1896 - 1900.

 

Making our way to the Pensby Close entrance of Moseley Bog, the walk took us up the wooden decking amongst the woods of trees. Before ending up walking through the Windermere Park or Windermere Playing Field. Exiting at Windermere Road. Before walking back down Wake Green Road past Moseley School. The walk had started from the Sarehole Mill Car Park, then via the Sarehole Mill Recreation Ground. Crossing over the Green Road ford, then heading up Green Road to Wake Green Road. Was hoping to find a route to the Yardley Wood Road entrance / exit, but ended up finding the Windermere Park / Playing Field instead.

 

Entering Moseley Bog from Pensby Close, saw this stream. Possibly the Coldbath Brook that goes from Moseley Golf Club to Sarehole Mill.

Heading onto the decking for a safe walk around the Bog without getting your shoes muddy (hopefully).

Another view of the stream (Coldbath Brook). Why would someone litter a can in it. It's not a bin! Dispose of your waste correctly, or take it home and bin it.

Another view of the Coldbath Brook.

The decking here is just three planks of wood bolted together on the ground.

Blue building behind the trees. It's Saint Bernard's Catholic Primary School on Wake Green Road.

No decking here. Just a dirt path with exposed tree roots. And the odd stone brick above the ground.

Back to cross over the decking. Wouldn't want to go into the bog there!

There is what looks like exposed staples as you go around the decking. Hopefully to enable people walking over it to keep a grip and not fall into the bog!

Another section of the wooden decking, with exposed stables on the surface.

Fallen trees around the bog and a body of water.

Onto another section of decking here.

This decking turns left at a right angle. Had some nice shadows in the sunshine.

Near the end of this decking.

A nice looking tree in the wood. The ground was all soil here. This leads up the hill to the Windermere Park.

One last look at the wood near the Windermere Park / Playing Field.

First look at the Windermere Park or Playing Field. Saw that goalpost.

And finally the walk through the Windermere Park (or Playing Field). Exiting onto Windermere Road. Would go past the Pickwick Cricket Club before going back onto the Wake Green Road.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown. Thanks for all the followers.

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60 passion points

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