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Green open spaces
10 Feb 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

The only time I went around Moseley Park was during a free open day in 2016

Normally to get into Moseley Park you need a key, so as I'm not a Moseley resident (at least not since I turned 5 years old), the only time I've been round the park (with my camera) was back in September 2016 during Birmingham Heritage Week. It is a private park not a public park. Would be nice for it to be open up to the public more regularly. Entrances on three roads.

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The only time I went around Moseley Park was during a free open day in 2016





Normally to get into Moseley Park you need a key, so as I'm not a Moseley resident (at least not since I turned 5 years old), the only time I've been round the park (with my camera) was back in September 2016 during Birmingham Heritage Week. It is a private park not a public park. Would be nice for it to be open up to the public more regularly. Entrances on three roads.


If you want to check out my previous related post, please click this link to the post: Moseley Hall Hospital and Moseley Park: Birmingham Heritage Week, September 2016.

 

Moseley Park

First up some history from the Wikipedia page.

It is an 11 acre private park maintained by the Moseley Trust, located close to the A435 Alcester Road in Moseley Village. The park was originally part of the estate of Moseley Hall, which were designed by the estate landscape gardener Humphry Repton. By the end of the 19th century, most of the surrounding land was sold for house building. Businessmen bought the parkland so to prevent any further development. The park was opened by local East Worcestershire MP Austen Chamberlain on 29 September 1899.

Since 1983 the park has been part of the wider Moseley Conservation Area. There is regular music festivals held in the park. A Grade II listed ice house dating from the 18th century is located in the park.

Access to the park is with a key for local residents, or you can purchase one with a deposit. The park has gated entrances on Salisbury Road, Alcester Road and from Chantry Road.

 

My only visit was during Birmingham Heritage Week during September 2016 (for details of that visit check the link at the top of this post which includes Moseley Hall Hospital). Which was free to enter, the gates were unlocked (I think there was guides at each gate that I recall from over 3 years ago now).

Probably my only way in now is with Karl Newton (who lives in Moseley and has a key).

 

August 2013

The entrance to Moseley Park & Pool from the Alcester Road. Just the sign between the buildings. Just seen in passing, without a key I couldn't go in. Decades before this, may have entered once, when someone I knew used to live nearby in Moseley.

April 2015

The Mostly Jazz Funk & Soul Festival was on in Moseley Park from the 10th to 12th July 2015. This banner was on St Mary's Row near Alcester Road, and seen from the no 50 bus during April 2015. That year they got Gregory Porter and Craig Charles to come and perform in Moseley Park.

Birmingham Heritage Week, September 2016

Heritage Open Days balloons seen at the unlocked gate on Salisbury Road. The open day had begun. This was after I had had a look around Moseley Hall (including the Dovecote and Cow Shed buildings).

The notice board at the Salisbury Road entrance. You can buy a key from Moseley Travel. I'm not a Moseley resident, so am not really planning or thinking of buying a key.

The path into the park from Salisbury Road.

The path continues amongst the trees.

First look inside of Moseley Park. During the Heritage Open Day there was bunting near the Ice House.

Unusual looking wooden benches / chairs and a table.

A directors chair from The Moseley Society/ This was near the Ice House (which you could enter on the open day at the time).

Now for a look around the pool. A pink H for Heritage Open Days was on the left.

Might have been September, but it was still quite summery in the park.

Such a lovely lake / pool to see that only Moseley locals get to see regularly.

Hard to believe that this is there, as if you are in a car or bus on the Alcester Road (50) or Salisbury Road (1, 1A or 35) you wouldn't even know that this pool was there (other than seeing the gates from the bus).

Trees leaning into the pool from the far end.

You could be in the countryside, not in Moseley, but remember this used to be part of the Moseley Hall estate. Just go to one of the many National Trust properties in the UK to get from the hall to the lake.

What looks like some rocks and a net at this corner of the pool.

These photos previously posted in my Birmingham Heritage Week post on Moseley Hall & Park. If you want to see a public outdoor pool (lake or pond), head to Swanshurst Park, for what is called the Moseley New Pool. Swanshurst Park through the seasons through the years.

Three trees with the pool. For another Moseley post, check out my Moseley Bog post here: Moseley Bog from my December 2012 and September 2016 visits.

A boat house and a big shed.

The path towards the pool, you can head either direction around it. Somewhere on this lawn would be where they set up those various music festivals. Is always a lot of traffic on the roads outside (and cars park half on the road and pavement). I think the Salisbury Road entrance is used for the VIP guests. Somehow they got the Jacksons to come to Moseley Park last year (one of the brothers is a Wolves fan now!).

The Ice House. Previously posted in my last post from here. Only a limited number of people can fit inside.

Before the fridge freezer was invented, this was where you stored your ice. Climb down the ladder. This was the view from the top (obviously I didn't climb down). You can find other similar Ice Houses at National Trust properties.

Heading to the Alcester Road exit. That green hut belongs to the Chantry Tennis Club. The tennis courts are behind the netted fences nearby to here.

The path to the Alcester Road exit / entrance. Volunteers out that day for the Heritage Open Day probably from the Moseley Trust that runs the park.

Turning around, there was two paths. The path on the left was near the tennis courts.

Saw this six wheeled vehicle before I left. John Deere - Cator. TH 6x4. Some kind of park maintenance vehicle I think. Wasn't too far from the Alcester Road gate.

October 2019

My most recent photos of Moseley Park were taken from outside the locked gate on Chantry Road. Somehow I missed this entrance during the September 2016 open day, as I entered via Salisbury Road and exited at the time at Alcester Road.

Looks like steps go down from the Chantry Road gate next to the sign.

Once again the noticeboard mentions that you need a key to enter the park (which I don't have). In the autumn the parks opening hours was 6am to 8pm. A Free Day Key is for a £10 refundable deposit.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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04 Feb 2020 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Bournville Park from Linden Road to Selly Oak Road

Bournville Park is a small park in the suburb of Bournville, between Linden Road and Selly Oak Road (and Oak Tree Lane). The Bourn flows through this little park. There is a playground close to Linden Road. A bowling green and tennis courts. Part of the Bournville Village Trust. Beyond here is the Merritts Brook Greenway, leading to the Valley Parkway.

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Bournville Park from Linden Road to Selly Oak Road





Bournville Park is a small park in the suburb of Bournville, between Linden Road and Selly Oak Road (and Oak Tree Lane). The Bourn flows through this little park. There is a playground close to Linden Road. A bowling green and tennis courts. Part of the Bournville Village Trust. Beyond here is the Merritts Brook Greenway, leading to the Valley Parkway.


Most of the time I see Bournville Park from either the 11C or 11A buses in passing, but I have popped into this park twice, once in 2012 and again in 2018. It's so small that you may not be in there for long, if you are walking around the Bournville area. If you are getting off the bus, or coming from the centre of the Bournville Village or Cadbury World, then you enter via Linden Road. The path takes you straight down to Oak Tree Lane and Selly Oak Road.

The playground is close to Linden Road and Bournville Village Primary School. Thorn Road and Beech Road are linked in the middle of the park by a path.

 

August 2012

Mid August 2012 and my first look around Bournville Park. This is the entrance from Thorn Road, the path going straight in the middle of the park.

Trees along the path from the Thorn Road entrance.

Footbridge over The Bourn which flows through the park. This is the stream / brook that gave it's name to Bournvile.

View of The Bourn towards the road bridge on Oak Tree Lane.

View of The Bourn into the park.

Another wooden footbridge that crosses The Bourn.

The Bourn dissects Bournville Park into two. The view towards the playground, or Play Area.

The Bourn towards the bowling green huts (which are up the path to the left).

Welcome to Bournville Park. This sign was on Linden Road and has a black and white photo portrait of George Cadbury. Bournville is in the Selly Oak Constituency.

The Bourn seen from the Linden Road end.

December 2018

I passed Bournville Park during one of my many walks around Bournville during May 2013, but didn't re-enter the park again at that time. So I didn't really go back into the park again until December 2018.

A squirrel near a tree. Squirrels always make nice park photos, if you can get them into focus.

Also saw this blackbird.

Pair of sheds from the bowling green.

The sheds from the front, bowling green to the left.

The Bourn looks quite different during the winter, or rather the trees do without the leaves on them. But the leaves were all over the grass.

This view of The Bourn from the bridge on Oak Tree Lane. Towards the footbridge I previously saw 6 years before.

Another Welcome to Bournville Park sign. This one on from the entrance near Oak Tree Lane.

Back to the playground, or Play Area. Not being used when I headed back to the Linden Road entrance.

All Birmingham parks have these yellow elephant signs in the playground and this one is no exception. Welcome to Bournville Park Play Area.

For another local park to Bournville Park, please check out my Cotteridge Park post here: Cotteridge Park: the park near the Cross City Line.

I'm hoping to do more park posts as soon as I can. I've recently visited Witton Lakes Park and Brookvale Park (December 2019). Also Hillfield Park in Solihull (January 2020). Other parks I regularly check out from time to time include the Oaklands Recreation Ground in South Yardley.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

Birmingham We Are People with Passion award winner 2020

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06 Jan 2020 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Grove Park in Harborne: near the former home of two past Birmingham MP's

Grove Park is located in Harborne on Harborne Park Road (one of the parks on the no 11 Outer Circle bus route 11A and 11C). The park was historically the grounds of The Grove, home to Thomas Attwood MP between 1823 and 1846. Later William Kenrick from the late 1870s until his death in 1919. Birmingham City Council inherited the park and house and opened the park in 1963.

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Grove Park in Harborne: near the former home of two past Birmingham MP's





Grove Park is located in Harborne on Harborne Park Road (one of the parks on the no 11 Outer Circle bus route 11A and 11C). The park was historically the grounds of The Grove, home to Thomas Attwood MP between 1823 and 1846. Later William Kenrick from the late 1870s until his death in 1919. Birmingham City Council inherited the park and house and opened the park in 1963.


Grove Park

The park was opened by Birmingham City Council in 1963 on land that was historically part of the estate of The Grove. Located on Harborne Park Road in Harborne, the park is also bordered by Mill Farm Road and Grove Lane.

Thomas Attwood lived at The Grove which was an 18th Century Georgian mansion house from 1823 until 1846. He was one of Birmingham's very first MP's. There is two statues of Attwood, the first sculpted by Peter Hollins used to be in Calthorpe Park, then later New Park, Sparkbrook, but has been in storage at the Birmingham Museum Collections Centre since 2008 (covered in graffiti and looking worse for wear). The other sitting statue used to be in Chamberlain Square, sculpted by Sioban Coppinger & Fiona Peever in 1993, until it was moved into storage in 2015 before the demolition of Birmingham Central Library for Paradise Birmingham. It is possible that it could return to Chamberlain Square later in 2020?

The second Birmingham MP to live in The Grove was William Kenrick. John Henry Chamberlain rebuilt the house for him from 1877 to 1878. Kenrick lived there until his death at the age of 88 in 1919.

There is a blue plaque near the Kenrick Centre on Mill Farm Road in Harborne that states that Alderman W. Byng Kenrick (1872 - 1962) gave the Grove Estate to the City. The park opened to the public a year after his death.

The house was demolished in 1963, and the paneled anteroom of the drawing room of The Grove was saved from destruction and acquired by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

 

2012

By first visit to Grove Park was during May 2012.

Welcome to Grove Park sign near one of the entrances on Harborne Park Road. Claims to be A public park since 1936. That could be a mistake if it was 1963?

A tree with many branches and green leaves close to the lake.

Another tree with one long over hanging branch.

In the pond / lake was this tree with pink flower heads.

The lake is small if compared to other lakes I've seen in other Birmingham park's.

Still it attracts geese and ducks etc.

Another bush with pink flower heads.

The end of the lake close to Harborne Park Road.

A Canada Goose in the lake.

2016

Grove Park during January 2016. The lake in winter. Trees with no leaves. Only brown leaves on the ground that fell in the autumn.

Gates on one of the paths. Some trees nearby may have been cut down.

Dark green picnic bench with seats on all four sides.

The playground which is close to Harborne Park Road. Swings near a bench. The public car park for this park is to the right of here.

2018

My most recent visit to Grove Park was during the autumn of November 2018. Mainly to find the blue plaque near the Kenrick Centre. The leaves were all orange and brown looking quite autumnal.

The playground and car park from the path towards Mill Farm Road.

Trees alongside Mill Farm Road. The blue plaque was up this way.

More trees. Mill Farm Road to the right, so this was probably after I saw the blue plaque for Alderman W. Byng Kenrick.

Trees and yellow leaves, the grass was still green.

Leaves all over the ground here as I headed back to a main path.

Can't visit a Birmingham park without seeing a squirrel with a nut!

The lake again in autumn.

More trees and more leaves on the ground.

This park is well worth visiting, if you get off the 11C or 11A buses. And is in walking distance of the Harborne High Street. It's also close to a Cricket Club and two Golf Courses.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Green open spaces
29 Dec 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Selly Oak Park: the gem of a park off the Selly Oak Bypass

Selly Oak Park is located on Harborne Lane in Selly Oak. Sections of the Lapal Canal goes through the north east corner of the park (still to be fully restored). The Selly Oak Bypass (Aston Webb Boulevard) opened in 2011 and the Selly Oak Shopping Park in 2018. They are now building a new section of the bypass near the former Sainsbury's site at Selly Oak Triangle. Also on Gibbins Rd.

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Selly Oak Park: the gem of a park off the Selly Oak Bypass





Selly Oak Park is located on Harborne Lane in Selly Oak. Sections of the Lapal Canal goes through the north east corner of the park (still to be fully restored). The Selly Oak Bypass (Aston Webb Boulevard) opened in 2011 and the Selly Oak Shopping Park in 2018. They are now building a new section of the bypass near the former Sainsbury's site at Selly Oak Triangle. Also on Gibbins Rd.


Selly Oak Park

This park is located on Harborne Lane and Gibbins Road in Selly Oak. It was developed under the Kings Norton and Northfield Urban District Council. Land was donated in February 1899 by members of the Gibbins family. The park was opened in April 1899 on Easter Monday. In 1911 the park was taken over by Birmingham City Council when Selly Oak became part of the city. More land was donated over the years. In 1913 and 1919 by the owners of the Birmingham Battery and Metal Company (also Gibbins family members), in 1935 to give access to the Weoley Park Farm Estate. More land in 1950 by the Birmingham Battery & Metal Company (again). In 1958 some land was transferred to the City’s Public Works Committee. More recent land donations in 1980 and 1982.

The shelter built in 1899, the bandstand built in 1908 and the Daughters of Rest Pavilion built in 1953 have all since been demolished.

The park is now maintained by The Friends of Selly Oak Park. That includes all the wooden sculptures found around the park.

2012

My first walk around Selly Oak Park was during June 2012, testing out my then new camera (which I had until about December 2015). I probably entered from Harborne Lane and headed up the main path.

One of the main squirrels in the park, with a nut.

Saw this red wind funnel thing. There is similar funnels in other nearby parks.

A council lawnmower going around the park cutting the grass.

The trees were so lush and green in the summer, the path curving round to the right.

Another squirrel behind a tree.

Two paths amongst the trees.

Distant view of the red funnel.

2017

The next visit to Selly Oak Park was during January 2017. The Friends of Selly Oak Park had commissioned all of these new wooden sculptures which were worth checking out. On this side it says Lapal.

To the side Welcome. So probably "Welcome to Selly Oak Park". This is near Gibbins Road.

A carved wooden bench. In memory of Geoff Bartlett, Founder of Friends of Selly Oak Park.

Part of the playground. A climbing frame, and a ride along a rope with a tyre (I think).

Another wooden sculpture. Of deer or a kangeroo (probably a deer and it's cub).

A new Welcome to Selly Oak Park sign. It's near the car park off Harborne Lane and close to the corner with Gibbins Road.

2018

This visit during March 2018. View of the new outdoor gym.

Daffodils alongside a path.

Selly Oak Park Play Area. One of the many Birmingham City Council elephant signs that you would find in this and other City parks. Behind was a slide.

Daffodils around a tree.

Daffodils and crocuses. From here I headed up Gibbins Road towards Lodge Hill Cemetery. Weoley Castle is also nearby.

Happy New Year 2020. More park posts to come during 2020.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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26 Dec 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Fox Hollies Park through the years along the Westley Brook

Fox Hollies Park is located on the Shirley Road between Acocks Green and Hall Green, and stretches as far as Gospel Lane. This park is quite small and has the Westley Brook flowing through it. Playgrounds at both ends and a small lake as well. To the west end is close to Fox Hollies Leisure Centre (but is not part of the park). Paths for walks, that can also be enjoyed by dog walkers too.

Related

Fox Hollies Park through the years along the Westley Brook





Fox Hollies Park is located on the Shirley Road between Acocks Green and Hall Green, and stretches as far as Gospel Lane. This park is quite small and has the Westley Brook flowing through it. Playgrounds at both ends and a small lake as well. To the west end is close to Fox Hollies Leisure Centre (but is not part of the park). Paths for walks, that can also be enjoyed by dog walkers too.


Fox Hollies Park

This park is located on the Shirley Road in Acocks Green, close to Hall Green. It stretches along the Westley Brook towards Gospel Lane, which isn't too far from Gospel Oak and Olton in Solihull on the Warwick Road. Other nearby roads surrounding the park include Pool Farm Road, Oakhurst Road and Severne Road. There is two playgrounds, one close to the Shirley Road entrance, the other near Gospel Lane. There is also a small lake / pond where you will find many of the usual bird species to be found in a park like this.

Most of the time I hardly see many people walking around this park. Maybe the odd person walking a dog. Assume that cyclists may pass through here. Or occasionally families using the playground in decent weather. Then again I've only been through it in the winter.

2010

These views of Fox Hollies Park from Shirley Road during December 2010. A snowy walk up Shirley Road and a look at the park. I did not enter the park at this time.

The playground covered in snow. Three people on a morning jog through the snow covered park.

Another view of the playground.

The old Birmingham City Council - Fox Hollies Park sign. It was already looking dirty when it was covered in snow.

Entrance to the park from Shirley Road. These old railings survived until at least 2017 or 2018 when they were replaced by the Council all the way around the park.

This from close to the entrance of Fox Hollies Leisure Centre. Apparently the Yardley Constituency Office is also there. The office for the Birmingham Yardley MP is now on Yardley Road in Acocks Green (Jess Phillips MP from 2015 to present). John Hemming used be the MP from 2005 to 2015.

View of the park from the opposite side of the Shirley Road. A Council advert about visiting Santa in his Grotto.

The furthest end of the park to the right on Shirley Road.

2017

I didn't really do an actual walk through Fox Hollies Park until January 2017. Getting in on the Shirley Road I walked as far as the Gospel Lane exit. Leaves on the lawn looking like it was still autumn.

Passing the empty playground which is close to the Shirley Road entrance.

The path curving around to the left.

Straight ahead on the path. This more or less is close to Oakhurst Road (which is to the right of here on the other side of the trees and houses).

Path up to the trees.

Distant houses probably on Pool Farm Road.

Two paths in two different directions.

The path up to Gospel Lane. The second playground is to the far right of here.

A look at the pond / lake. Bit hard to get decent views of it, trees in the way.

2018

Another walk round Fox Hollies Park, this time during December 2018. Slightly different route this time. And the Council was installing new wooden railings and bollards throughout the park. This footbridge crossing the Westley Brook.

The Wesley Brook from one side.

And from the other side.

One of the new Welcome to Fox Hollies Park wooden sign and entrance with metal bars. This was on Pool Farm Road.

I wasn't quite finished with Fox Hollies Park, so I walked up to the second entrance on Pool Farm Road. Still had the old Council sign on the right.

A close up look at the slide in the playground close to Gospel Lane.

Back of the new exit / entrance to Gospel Lane.

And the front side with Welcome to Fox Hollies Park. As you can see it's near the playground at the Gospel Lane end. From here you can catch the no 4A bus to Birmingham.

2019

On Christmas Eve Eve in December 2019, I was walking up Shirley Road and remembered that they were installing the new railings here the year before. Seem to recall hoping over the old railings, but they hadn't finished the new ones. A year on and it is complete.

As well as the new Welcome to Fox Hollies Park wooden entrance sign, the Council has also installed a new sign on the left.

The new railings are slightly higher than the old ones, tries to make the park look nice and modern.

Hopefully other City parks will get new railings like these. But it would be nice for more people to use Fox Hollies Park. It's just a quiet out of the way park, that other than locals, people wouldn't really be aware of.

Merry Christmas 2019 and a Happy New Year 2020. Oh and Happy Hanukkah (will all be over when this gets published). More park posts to come in 2020. Look out for Witton Lakes Park, Brookvale Park and the Oaklands Recreation Ground.

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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