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GreenActionWithYou

Protecting our environment

Green Action with You is all about promoting and supporting social value, providing a shared digital space where people can showcase what they do and can together make a difference by helping to protect their environment.

Launch date: June 2019
Combined FreeTimePays following: 101K


Community sponsors:

Environment & green action
Displaying until 11 Dec 2019 - FreeTimePays
Featuring

GreenActionWithYou - let us promote and support your initiative!

With a combined reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays launches a unique digital space and portal for people to promote and share their passion for a healthy and clean environment.

Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and help promote the passion that is our environment!

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GreenActionWithYou - let us promote and support your initiative!





With a combined reach of 100,000, FreeTimePays launches a unique digital space and portal for people to promote and share their passion for a healthy and clean environment.

Take the full post to find out more and see how you can get involved.

Connect with us and help promote the passion that is our environment!


GreenActionWithYou is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

GreenActionwithYou is a digital space for people who want to make a difference of for those who want to do whatever they can to help maintain a clean and healthy environment.

At GreenActionWithYou, we help connect people where passions are shared; we give people FREE access to their very own digital space where they can promote their passion; and we recognise people for the contributions they make through the allocation of Passion Points. Interested? Connect with us HERE.

The reach of FreeTimePays is huge and is growing with Communities of Passion being rolled out across the UK. 

Companies and organisations keen to support People with Passion play an essential role and we have a range of partnership, sponsorship and advertising packages available.

We can even go as far as to set groups and networks up with their own portal so they can grow their own branded Community of Passion linked to their own website or social media account.

View our Partnership arrangements or connect with us HERE.

Now let's show you what you get with FreeTimePays. 

FreeTimePays

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

There are three components to FreeTimePays.

There’s Community Passport, Community Workspace and Community Matchmaker. Operating right across the platform in recognition of the valuable contribution being made by users is FreeTimePays gamification. This takes the form of points and rewards for passions shared.

FreeTimePays is here for people who really want to become involved in their community or with their particular passion and for those people who are really serious about making a difference. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the great ideas with those who have the potential to turn an idea into something that really does make a difference.

Community Passport

Passport is a personal space which registered members can make their own. With a passport, members can choose to get involved with their passion and participate in many different ways.

They can view regular content and posts; sort and save this content by type or by passion; they can collect points for giving their views through polls and surveys, attend events or even join a discussion.

With a FreeTimePays Community Passport, members can follow inspiring people and they can learn more about their community and their passion by following regular ‘Did you Know’ features. And the more they decide to do and the more they get involved, the more points they collect and the greater the opportunity to take up offers and win prizes.

Community Workspace

With their unique Community Workspace, FreeTimePays is able to help those who are inspired and serious about taking things to the next level. FreeTimePays will give these people their own access rights environment where they can work on their idea or project.

In this digital space they can work alone, or bring in others to share in building evidence, acquiring knowledge and developing plans. This is the ideal space for working on the business; working on the idea; working on the initiative.

A range of facilities and tools can be found in workspace and users can effectively utilise this space for collating documents, photos, videos and web links, for opening up discussion and chat with others, or for running surveys and analysing results.

Community Matchmaker

The whole focus and rationale for FreeTimePays is MAKING A DIFFERENCE. It’s our job at FreeTimePays to provide the tools and functionality that helps bring together those who create the GREAT IDEAS with those who have the potential to turn an IDEA into something that really does MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

Matchmaker is where the dreamers can join with the dream makers – with those who are more than happy to put their support, their resources, their connections, and their wealth of experience behind the idea and behind the passionate people responsible for coming up with the idea.

These are the community drivers, the investors, the philanthropists, the funders of great initiatives, the Lottery, and those from local government and the public sector who are responsible for the provision of public services.

These are the people and the organisations who are in positions of making things happen for those who are passionate and inspired to want to make a difference.

For more detail on what is provided by FreeTimePays connect HERE.

GreenActionWithYou

GreenActionWithYou will grow as a shared space for the many individuals, communities and businesses that will want to connect and share in their passion for a clean and healthy environment.

Their work, their ideas and their proposals can be pulled together in the one collaborative space giving them access to a huge resource bank for sharing images, documents and web links. 

In this space people can chat in a secure environment if they wish; they can set up and promote events; or they can communicate with any of the FreeTimePays Communities through creating and submitting posts. 

We would be delighted to tell you more.

Contact Jonathan Bostock at jonathan.bostock@freetimepays.com or connect HERE with FreeTimePays for more information on sharing your passion for a clean and healthy environment.

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75 passion points
Environment & green action
Displaying until 10 Dec 2019 - FreeTimePays
Featuring

Do you want to help protect the environment? You can!

GreenActionWithYou is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that helps people who want to make a difference, deliver real change and contribute towards positive social impact.

We give people who want to make a difference the digital space and the digital tools so they can engage with others, promote what they are doing and use the space to take their passion to the next level.

Related

Do you want to help protect the environment? You can!





GreenActionWithYou is a FreeTimePays Community of Passion that helps people who want to make a difference, deliver real change and contribute towards positive social impact.

We give people who want to make a difference the digital space and the digital tools so they can engage with others, promote what they are doing and use the space to take their passion to the next level.


GreenActionWithYou is all about engaging people in the promotion and of a healthy and clean environment and the recognition that our environment and the space around us is there for us all to enjoy and look after.

GreenActionWithYou is a Community of Passion that utilises FreeTimePays digital engagement and social media to deliver real change and positive social impact.

FreeTimePays is an impact focused digital platform and social media channel specifically for people who want to make a difference and create a positive social and economic impact.

FreeTimePays is the social media of choice for 'People with Passion'.

With FreeTimePays, we help people take their passion to the next level by giving them access to a suite of digital tools and applications.

With Passion Points and with the support of our FreeTimePays partners, we recognise people for the difference and contribution they make and the positive impact they collectively deliver. 

Connect with us HERE and take your passion to the next level.

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60 passion points
Environment & green action
14 Oct 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Pype Hayes Park: the park near Erdington and not far from Sutton Coldfield

I've visited Pype Hayes Park twice in the winter of 2018/19. First time around late December 2018 for a walk up the Plants Brook towards Wylde Green. Second time a month later in January 2019 after a walk from New Hall Valley Country Park towards Tyburn. In both cases saw the derelict Pype Hayes Hall which is in urgent need of restoration by the council.

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Pype Hayes Park: the park near Erdington and not far from Sutton Coldfield





I've visited Pype Hayes Park twice in the winter of 2018/19. First time around late December 2018 for a walk up the Plants Brook towards Wylde Green. Second time a month later in January 2019 after a walk from New Hall Valley Country Park towards Tyburn. In both cases saw the derelict Pype Hayes Hall which is in urgent need of restoration by the council.


Pype Hayes Park is located near Erdington and Pype Hayes in North Birmingham, also close to Tyburn. It's main entrance is on the Chester Road. The corner of Chester Road and Eachelhurst Road marks the furthest end of the park. In the park is the Grade II listed building Pype Hayes Hall (now derelict and boarded up). There is also a pond.

December 2018

For a Christmas Day 2018 walk we went to Pype Hayes Park. Heading past some trees.

More trees seen as we headed down the path towards the Plants Brook.

I think this was the path that took us down to the Plants Brook and out of the park towards Wylde Green (and Walmley Golf Club). When we got to the Sutton Park Line railway bridge we turned back. Beyond was New Hall Valley Country Park (I would be back that way a month later).

After coming back along the Plants Brook, went up to look at the remains of Pype Hayes Hall. It dates from the late 18th / early 19th century. The listing says that it was a stucco refacing of house of an earlier 17th century timber framed house.

It was part of the Manor of Pype. It ended up in the Bagot family from about 1630. The Bagot's sold some of the land in the 1880s for the creation of the Minworth Sewage Works. The rest sold to Birmingham City Council in 1920. And the hall was used for various public social uses.

A look at a path and trees beyond the derelict hall. From this side it was fenced off, so wasn't much to see.

A playground not too far from the hall.

In the car leaving on Chester Road. A line of evergreen trees.

Leaving the main entrance from the car park.

One of the signs for Pype Hayes Park.

January 2019

I knew that I missed seeing the pond the first time around as got off the Plants Brook footpath early. This time walked all the way to the end and made it to the pond this time. I had got a bus to Sutton Coldfield, then walked down through the New Hall Valley Country Park (going past the New Hall Water Mill) and back down the Plants Brook to the familiar path I was on the month before.

A close up look at the pond, the usual swans and gulls to be found swimming in it.

A pair of swans and various gulls.

Found a garden to the back of Pype Hayes Hall. But being January was nothing much planted there, and I didn't return in the spring or summer to see what it should look like in warmer months.

Coming back here meant I got to se the other side of Pype Hayes Hall. This side from the garden.

The hall was looking quite white on this side, but hedges in the way.

Pype Hayes Hall was run as a residential children's home from about 1949 to the 1970s. Fences around the hedges.

In 1974 the body of a woman child-care worker was found in the grounds of Pype Hayes. A man called Thornton who also worked at the hall was a suspect, but it was later found that there was no evidence of him linked to the murder. Fences around the hedges continued, no access to the public from the park.

Another woman murdered 157 years earlier shared similarities with this 1974 death, and one of the accused men was also called Thornton. Some more derelict buildings, probably a barn or stables.

There might be "Plans to restore them for use as a 60-bed hotel, spa and swimming pool", but I'm not sure if that would happen or what the council is planning to do here. That was back in 2015.They can't leave it in this state!

After this headed to a bus stop and got a 67 back to the city centre, passing a boarded up pub called The Bagot Arms on the way. There was a sign on the pub saying that it would be a "Bar & Grill" coming soon. Has it opened now?

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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60 passion points
Environment & green action
07 Oct 2019 - Elliott Brown
Gallery

Aston Hall and Park in autumn and winter

A look around Aston Park, the home of Aston Hall. The estate of Sir Thomas Holte in the 17th century. Later home to James Watt Jr. The park in the winter of January 2010 and December 2016. The autumn of September 2017. The park is also quite close to Villa Park, home of Aston Villa FC.

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Aston Hall and Park in autumn and winter





A look around Aston Park, the home of Aston Hall. The estate of Sir Thomas Holte in the 17th century. Later home to James Watt Jr. The park in the winter of January 2010 and December 2016. The autumn of September 2017. The park is also quite close to Villa Park, home of Aston Villa FC.


Aston Park is located on the Trinity Road in Aston, and is mainly known for Aston Hall at the centre of the park. Not far away is Villa Park, home of Aston Villa Football Club. The park is reachable on foot from both Witton Station and Aston Station. As well as various local bus routes.

I first travelled to Aston by bus in January 2010, getting off at the Six Ways Island near the Birchfield Road. At the time there was a lot of snow in the area. My full Flickr album: Aston Hall and Park.

January 2010

Approaching Aston Park from the Trinity Road, already I could see that the grounds were all covered in snow. The North Lodge and Stables were visible in the background.

Now heading up the main road into the park, with so much snow, I couldn't see where the road or the grass was! The stable block is the entrance to Aston Hall, but as it was winter (January 2010) it was closed.

First look at Aston Hall in this winter scene from January 2010. It is a Grade I listed building designed by John Thorpe and built between 1618 and 1635, for Sir Thomas Holte. A Jacobean mansion, the house was bought in 1864 by the Birmingham Corporation, becoming the first historic country house to pass into municipal ownership. It is still owned by Birmingham City Council, but is now run as museum by the Birmingham Museums Trust.

The North Lodge and stables. Also a Grade I listed building as the Stable Range to North of Northern Lodge, Aston Hall. Dates to the middle of the 18th century. The entrance to the courtyard is through the gatewat in the middle of the former stabels range.

Turning around (I think this was still near the stables range) looking at the snow covered Aston Park. I was heading back down to Trinity Road, where I would then have a look around Villa Park. This was the only time I saw Aston Park with snow, and since then, I've not seen the park with snow.

December 2016

A walk that started at Dartmouth Middleway ended at Aston Park. I went up Chester Street towards Park Circus (was some sculptures to see along the way). Headed into the park via Frederick Road near this playground. By the looks of the map, I missed seeing King Edward VI Aston School.

A look at Lady Holte's Garden at Aston Hall through the gate. I would have to wait until September 2017, during Birmingham Heritage Week, before having a good explore of this garden.

Another view of Lady Holte's Garden during winter 2016/17. Completely empty as the hall is always closed during winter. It's normally open from Easter to the end of October.

A path in the park near Witton Lane. It might have been winter, but looked very autumnal at the time with the leaves on the ground.

One of the paths that runs alongside Trinity Road. No snow, so the main road up to the hall was clear to see. An Aston Hall sign with opening times. My next visit to the park would be around 9 months later when I heard about the Civil War Siege event during Birmingham Heritage Week. After I left the park, I walked to Aston Station to get a train back into Birmingham City Centre (wasn't going to walk back).

September 2017

Follow this link on the Civil War Siege, which was the main reason at the time for going back to Aston Park.

A look around Lady Holte's Garden. This water feature at the time was dry, maybe there is water in here in the summer? A fountain in the shape of a cross.

The far left side of Lady Holte's Garden. Plenty of trees and flowers to see in the middle of September 2017. The side of Aston Hall. During the Civil War Siege, I had time to explore the inside of the hall, before it go too busy.

I noticed that a cricket match was underway in Aston Park, at the same time as the Civil War Siege event (not related in any way). So around Aston Hall were Civil War re-enactors. And down on the cricket pitch, cricketers!

The back of Aston Hall, many flower beds with yellow and orange coloured flowers. The Pan sculpture in the middle. It has been missing it's head for many years now. There was also stone vases by famous Birmingham sculptor William Bloye.

A path round the back of Aston Park. After the Civil War Siege, had a look around the gardens, before heading down this path towards Trinity Road, and heading back to Aston Station.

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

 

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60 passion points
Environment & green action
30 Sep 2019 - Elliott Brown
Inspiration

Handsworth Park the park near where Boulton and Watt are buried

Went to Handsworth to check out St Mary's Church and Handsworth Park. The church was closed for renovation works so couldn't go inside. The park has a boating lake and an arts trail. Found two of The Big Sleuth 2017 bears in one half of the park. I got the tram but no 16 bus route is nearby if I go again! 

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Handsworth Park the park near where Boulton and Watt are buried





Went to Handsworth to check out St Mary's Church and Handsworth Park. The church was closed for renovation works so couldn't go inside. The park has a boating lake and an arts trail. Found two of The Big Sleuth 2017 bears in one half of the park. I got the tram but no 16 bus route is nearby if I go again! 


See also my Handsworth heritage buildings post. Find all my my Handsworth Park photos over on my Flickr.

The main entrance gates to Handsworth Park from Hamstead Road. I continued on to get close to St Mary's Church, until I noticed that their was renovation works. I then crossed over the road for some more views of the church, before heading into the park. The gate on the right was open on my visit.

Before I got to St Mary's Church on Hamstead Road in Handsworth, I had a look at the lodge house in Handsworth Park. Dated 1897. Not listed.

I had a walk around the boating lake, walking anti-clockwise. The lodge / gate house of 1897 with it's distinctive clock tower and turreted roof.

The Victorian Drinking Fountain Canopy, now part of the Handsworth Park Arts Trail. Probably dating to the late 19th century. Originally called The Austin Lines Fountain. The drinking fountain itself has long since been removed. This view from the Hamstead Road, through the metal fence above the brick wall (on the walk to St Mary's Church, noticed a part of the wall that is broken and in urgent need of repair).

The boating lake from the Hamstead Road end of Handsworth Park. Plenty of Canada geese and gulls in this lake. Saw some boats at the other end of the lake.

Several boats near the island in the middle of the lake. They were up-side-down!

A relatively new sculpture unveiled in 2017, called SS Journey, made by the sculptor Luke Perry. Seen from the path I took on the walk around the lake.

It is dedicated to the brave individuals who have left their homes around the world and made the journey to Handsworth and other parts of the UK, seeking a new life for themselves and their families. The sculpture is cast in bronze. I think the ship part looks like it was made of steel. It faces one corner of the boating lake.

Saw this squirrel on top of a bench. As per usual, when you get close to a squirrel they run away! It's already looking autumnal in his park with leaves on the lawn.

What looks like an old drinking fountain. It's called Umbrello and it is Grade II listed. It was presented to the park in 1888 by Austin B Lines. Octagonal in plan. Had two shields with inscriptions on them. One of them had a pelican on it.

I eventually headed back to the Hamstead Road entrance / exit. And then headed down Holly Road. I was aware of the Soho railway line running through the park, but missed using any of the footbridges here. I re-entered the other half of the park when I saw one of The Big Sleuth bears from summer 2017.

In the summer of 2017, I didn't get around to travelling to Handsworth, so missed seeing The Big Sleuth bears. Although around late July 2017 came back on the bus through Handsworth after doing Bearwood, Dudley and West Bromwich. These bears are now part of the Handsworth Park Arts Trail, and were installed in October 2017.

This is Sun Guardian created by Goosensi working with Friends of Handsworth Park and the Handsworth Community.

 

Seen outside of the Handsworth Wellbeing Centre (Handsworth Leisure Centre) was Well Active Bear. Created by Mark Copplestone and Jennie Saunders working with Birmingham Wellbeing Service.

Seen on this cylinder outside of the Handsworth Wellbeing Centre was this piece of graffiti street art, part of the Arts Trail in the park. Handsworth Revolution - Steel Pulse.

The Handsworth Playcentre is to the left of the Steel Pulse piece. Mostly painted in sky blue paint, with a variety of other colours. Part of the Handsworth Leisure / Wellbeing Centre.

After this, I left the park via Grove Lane and then headed towards Winson Green Outer Circle Tram Stop. Which was about a 20 minute walk away. Maybe one day a new railway station could be built in the middle of the park. Apparently Handsworth Wood Station was here from 1896 to 1941. Passengers found the no 16 bus to be more convenient. Maybe a new staton could be built there on the line from Birmingham New Street towards Walsall on the Chase Line. Similiar to the proposals to rebuild the stations on the Camp Hill Line (Hazelwell, Kings Heath and Moseley).

 

Photos taken by Elliott Brown.

Follow me on Twitter here ellrbrown.

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50 passion points

Top Contributors

Karl Newton
GreenActionWithYou points: 1040
Combined FreeTimePays points: 2740
Elliott Brown
GreenActionWithYou points: 960
Combined FreeTimePays points: 21K
Laura Creaven
GreenActionWithYou points: 920
Combined FreeTimePays points: 940
FreeTimePays
GreenActionWithYou points: 811
Combined FreeTimePays points: 19K
The Friends of Kings Heath Park
GreenActionWithYou points: 270
Combined FreeTimePays points: 500

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